umbrageous


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Related to umbrageous: ostentatious, inordinate

um·bra·geous

 (ŭm-brā′jəs)
adj.
1. Affording or forming shade; shady.
2. Easily offended; irritable.

um·bra′geous·ly adv.

umbrageous

(ʌmˈbreɪdʒəs)
adj
shady or shading
umˈbrageously adv
umˈbrageousness n

um•bra•geous

(ʌmˈbreɪ dʒəs)

adj.
1. shady.
2. apt to take offense.
[1580–90]
um•bra′geous•ly, adv.
um•bra′geous•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.umbrageous - filled with shadeumbrageous - filled with shade; "the shady side of the street"; "the surface of the pond is dark and shadowed"; "we sat on rocks in a shadowy cove"; "cool umbrageous woodlands"
shaded - protected from heat and light with shade or shadow; "shaded avenues"; "o'er the shaded billows rushed the night"- Alexander Pope
2.umbrageous - angered at something unjust or wrongumbrageous - angered at something unjust or wrong; "an indignant denial"; "incensed at the judges' unfairness"; "a look of outraged disbelief"; "umbrageous at the loss of their territory"
angry - feeling or showing anger; "angry at the weather"; "angry customers"; "an angry silence"; "sending angry letters to the papers"

umbrageous

adjective
Casting shade:
Translations
References in classic literature ?
The chief beauty of trees consists in the deep shadow of their umbrageous boughs, while fancy pictures a moving multitude of shapes and forms flitting and passing beneath that shade.
The umbrageous shades where the interview took place--the glorious tropical vegetation around--the picturesque grouping of the mingled throng of soldiery and natives--and even the golden-hued bunch of bananas that I held in my hand at the time, and of which I occasionally partook while making the aforesaid philosophical reflections.
Occasionally there were intervals of pasturage, and the banks of the river were fringed with willows and cottonwood, so that its course might be traced from the hilltops, winding under an umbrageous covert, through a wide sunburnt landscape.
Sir Leicester is content enough that the ironmaster should feel that there is no hurry there; there, in that ancient house, rooted in that quiet park, where the ivy and the moss have had time to mature, and the gnarled and warted elms and the umbrageous oaks stand deep in the fern and leaves of a hundred years; and where the sun-dial on the terrace has dumbly recorded for centuries that time which was as much the property of every Dedlock--while he lasted-- as the house and lands.