unabated


Also found in: Thesaurus.

un·a·bat·ed

 (ŭn′ə-bā′tĭd)
adj.
Sustaining an original intensity or maintaining full force with no decrease: an unabated windstorm; a battle fought with unabated violence.

un′a·bat′ed·ly adv.

unabated

(ˌʌnəˈbeɪtɪd)
adj
without losing any original force or violence; undiminished
ˌunaˈbatedly adv

un•a•bat•ed

(ˌʌn əˈbeɪ tɪd)

adj.
with undiminished force, power, or vigor.
[1605–15]
un`a•bat′ed•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unabated - continuing at full strength or intensity; "the winds are unabated"; "the popularity of his books among young people continued unabated"
intense - possessing or displaying a distinctive feature to a heightened degree; "intense heat"; "intense anxiety"; "intense desire"; "intense emotion"; "the skunk's intense acrid odor"; "intense pain"; "enemy fire was intense"
Translations

unabated

[ˈʌnəˈbeɪtɪd] ADJsin disminución, no disminuido
the storm continued unabatedla tormenta siguió sin amainar

unabated

[ˌʌnəˈbeɪtɪd]
adj [enthusiasm] → non diminué(e)
adv
to continue unabated → continuer sans relâche

unabated

adjunvermindert; the rain/storm continued unabatedder Regen/Sturm ließ nicht nach

unabated

[ˌʌnəˈbeɪtɪd] adj (energy, enthusiasm) → costante, inesauribile
to be or continue unabated (storm, wind) → non accennare a diminuire (fighting) → senza tregua
References in classic literature ?
Stubb saw him pause; and perhaps intending, not vainly, though, to evince his own unabated fortitude, and thus keep up a valiant place in his Captain's mind, he advanced, and eyeing the wreck exclaimed -- The thistle the ass refused; it pricked his mouth too keenly, sir; ha
Mythology is the crop which the Old World bore before its soil was exhausted, before the fancy and imagination were affected with blight; and which it still bears, wherever its pristine vigor is unabated.
I read them over and over again with unabated interest.
They continued together with unabated regard however, till the marriage of Miss Campbell, who by that chance, that luck which so often defies anticipation in matrimonial affairs, giving attraction to what is moderate rather than to what is superior, engaged the affections of Mr.
The Author of the Waverley Novels had hitherto proceeded in an unabated course of popularity, and might, in his peculiar district of literature, have been termed L'Enfant G
I told him, moreover, that I believed myself mistaken in supposing, as I had done, that your sister was indifferent to him; and as I could easily perceive that his attachment to her was unabated, I felt no doubt of their happiness together.
Although, as a general case, a ship unlucky in falling in with whales continues to cruise after them until she has barely sufficient provisions remaining to take her home, turning round then quietly and making the best of her way to her friends, yet there are instances when even this natural obstacle to the further prosecution of the voyage is overcome by headstrong captains, who, bartering the fruits of their hard-earned toils for a new supply of provisions in some of the ports of Chili or Peru, begin the voyage afresh with unabated zeal and perseverance.
After a short pause, however, the subject still continued, and was discussed with unabated eagerness, every one's inclination increasing by the discussion, and a knowledge of the inclination of the rest; and though nothing was settled but that Tom Bertram would prefer a comedy, and his sisters and Henry Crawford a tragedy, and that nothing in the world could be easier than to find a piece which would please them all, the resolution to act something or other seemed so decided as to make Edmund quite uncomfortable.
His gloom, however(which I considered quite natural under the circumstances), seemed entirely unabated.
It requires the feminine temperament to repeat the same thing three times with unabated zest.
But Tip had no breath to speak, so the Saw-Horse continued his wild career unchecked and with unabated speed.
I returned, however, with unabated vigour to my work--a more arduous task than anyone can imagine, who has not felt something like the misery of being charged with the care and direction of a set of mischievous, turbulent rebels, whom his utmost exertions cannot bind to their duty; while, at the same time, he is responsible for their conduct to a higher power, who exacts from him what cannot be achieved without the aid of the superior's more potent authority; which, either from indolence, or the fear of becoming unpopular with the said rebellious gang, the latter refuses to give.