unadorned

(redirected from unadornedly)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal.
Related to unadornedly: preoccupied, stern

un·a·dorned

 (ŭn′ə-dôrnd′)
adj.
Without adornment or embellishment; simple or plain.

unadorned

(ˌʌnəˈdɔːnd)
adj
not decorated; plain: a bare unadorned style.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unadorned - not decorated with something to increase its beauty or distinctionunadorned - not decorated with something to increase its beauty or distinction
unclothed - not wearing clothing
plain - not elaborate or elaborated; simple; "plain food"; "stuck to the plain facts"; "a plain blue suit"; "a plain rectangular brick building"
adorned, decorated - provided with something intended to increase its beauty or distinction

unadorned

adjective plain, simple, severe, stark, straightforward, restrained, unfussy, unembellished, unornamented The room is typically simple and unadorned.

unadorned

adjective
1. Without addition, decoration, or qualification:
2. Of a plain and unsophisticated nature:
Translations

unadorned

[ˈʌnəˈdɔːnd] ADJsin adorno, sencillo
beauty unadornedla hermosura sin adorno
the unadorned truthla verdad lisa y llana

unadorned

[ˌʌnəˈdɔːrnd] adjsans ornement

unadorned

adjschlicht; woman’s beautynatürlich; truthungeschminkt; proseschmucklos

unadorned

[ˌʌnəˈdɔːnd] adjdisadorno/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Gurungs and other Nepalis, like the Sherpas described by James Fisher (2004), "have a public, onstage side that they want the rest of the world to see, and a private, backstage side that is more unadornedly true to themselves" (373-74) that they do not care to put on display.
Affectionately nicknamed "A Wag on the Wall," the typical New England householder's clock occupied space in the kitchen, unadornedly making "a pleasant, companionable, unhurried sound--'tick
The same could be said for the light, the jug, the vineyard and the room in the first stanza of the first poem by Trakl that Heidegger cites (12) (though the final sentence of `Enfance (III)': `Il y a enfin, quand l'on a faim et soif, quelqu'un qui vous chasse', might be said to accommodate an experience of the laws governing private property and trespass which disturbs what Derrida has called `the tranquil self-evidence of the "there is"' (13) and so spoils Heidegger's austere Arcadia, tidily strewn with goods organic or unadornedly man-made).