unaided


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Related to unaided: Unaided Recall

un·aid·ed

 (ŭn-ā′dĭd)
adj.
Carried out or functioning without aid or assistance: made an unaided attempt to climb the sheer cliff.

unaided

(ʌnˈeɪdɪd)
adj
without having received any help
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unaided - carried out without aid or assistance; "his first unaided walk through the park"
unassisted - lacking help

unaided

adjective alone, solo, single-handed, unaccompanied, without help previous attempts to reach the North Pole unaided
Translations

unaided

[ˈʌnˈeɪdɪd]
A. ADVsin ayuda, por sí solo
B. ADJ by his own unaided effortssin ayuda de nadie, por sí solo

unaided

[ʌnˈeɪdɪd] adjsans assistance

unaided

advohne fremde Hilfe; to do something unaidedetw allein or ohne fremde Hilfe tun
adj his own unaided workseine eigene Arbeit; by my own unaided effortsganz ohne fremde Hilfe; unaided by somebodyohne jds Hilfe; unaided by somethingohne Zuhilfenahme von etw; with the unaided eyemit dem bloßen Auge; to be invisible to the unaided eyemit dem bloßen Auge nicht sichtbar sein

unaided

[ʌnˈeɪdɪd]
1. advsenza aiuto
2. adj by his own unaided effortscon le sue sole forze, senza l'aiuto di nessuno
References in classic literature ?
But to her unaccustomed vision the stretch of water behind her assumed the aspect of a barrier which her unaided strength would never be able to overcome.
Then had followed the news that the producer of this awful event was a stranger, a mighty magician at Arthur's court; that he could have blown out the sun like a candle, and was just going to do it when his mercy was purchased, and he then dissolved his enchantments, and was now recognized and honored as the man who had by his unaided might saved the globe from destruction and its peoples from extinction.
The novelty of an evening's entertainment, conducted from beginning to end by the unaided exertions of a young lady
When I heard that Nada, my daughter, still lived, I wept for joy, though like Umslopogaas I was torn by doubt and fear, for it is far for an unaided maid to travel from Swaziland to the Ghost Mountain.
thy hope was to have reacht The highth of thy aspiring unoppos'd, The Throne of God unguarded, and his side Abandond at the terror of thy Power Or potent tongue; fool, not to think how vain Against th' Omnipotent to rise in Arms; Who out of smallest things could without end Have rais'd incessant Armies to defeat Thy folly; or with solitarie hand Reaching beyond all limit, at one blow Unaided could have finisht thee, and whelmd Thy Legions under darkness; but thou seest All are not of thy Train; there be who Faith Prefer, and Pietie to God, though then To thee not visible, when I alone Seemd in thy World erroneous to dissent From all: my Sect thou seest, now learn too late How few somtimes may know, when thousands err.
Our sense of touch, stimulated by necessity, and developed by long training, enables us to distinguish angles far more accurately than your sense of sight, when unaided by a rule or measure of angles.
Nature must accomplish the rest unaided or Korak must die.
I tried to call to them, but the language they had was apparently different from that of the Over-world people; so that I was needs left to my own unaided efforts, and the thought of flight before exploration was even then in my mind.
Eudosia was permitted to cloak and get into the carriage unaided by any beau, a thing that had not happened to her since speculation had brought her father into notice.
No fire was there, however, and no fuel laid ready to light; the lace-mender was unable to allow herself that indulgence, especially now when, deprived by death of her sole relative, she had only her own unaided exertions to rely on.
There was no theatrical procession of demure little choristers, trying their best not to simper under the admiring gaze of the congregation: the people's share in the service was taken by the people themselves, unaided, except that a few good voices, judiciously posted here and there among them, kept the singing from going too far astray.
But the son of Tydeus caught up a mighty stone, so huge and great that as men now are it would take two to lift it; nevertheless he bore it aloft with ease unaided, and with this he struck Aeneas on the groin where the hip turns in the joint that is called the "cup-bone.