unalterable

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un·al·ter·a·ble

 (ŭn-ôl′tər-ə-bəl)
adj.
Impossible to alter: the unalterable season of bitter cold in Siberia.

un·al′ter·a·bil′i·ty, un·al′ter·a·ble·ness n.
un·al′ter·a·bly adv.

unalterable

(ʌnˈɔːltərəbəl; -ˈɔːltrəbəl)
adj
(of a condition, truth, etc) unable to be changed or altered

un•al•ter•a•ble

(ʌnˈɔl tər ə bəl)

also inalterable



adj.
not capable of being altered, changed, or modified.
[1610–15]
un•al′ter•a•ble•ness, un•al`ter•a•bil′i•ty, n.
un•al′ter•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unalterable - not capable of being changed or alteredunalterable - not capable of being changed or altered; "unalterable resolve"; "an unalterable ground rule"
alterable - capable of being changed or altered in some characteristic; "alterable clothing"; "alterable conditions of employment"
2.unalterable - of a sentenceunalterable - of a sentence; that cannot be changed; "an unalterable death sentence"
law, jurisprudence - the collection of rules imposed by authority; "civilization presupposes respect for the law"; "the great problem for jurisprudence to allow freedom while enforcing order"
incommutable - not subject to alteration or change
3.unalterable - remaining the same for indefinitely long times
unchangeable - not changeable or subject to change; "a fixed and unchangeable part of the germ plasm"-Ashley Montagu; "the unchangeable seasons"; "one of the unchangeable facts of life"

unalterable

unalterable

adjective
1. Incapable of changing or being modified:
2. That cannot be revoked or undone:
Translations

unalterable

[ʌnˈɒltərəbl] ADJinalterable

unalterable

[ˌʌnˈɔːltərəbəl] adjimmuable

unalterable

adj intention, decision, factunabänderlich; lawsunveränderlich

unalterable

[ʌnˈɒltrəbl] adjinalterabile
References in periodicals archive ?
In his essay "Of the Difference in Opinion," published in 1797, Godwin observes that the habit of overvaluing consistency, at least when it comes to politics, is endemic to "the vulgar," who lay too much stress on "the unalterableness of .