unambivalent

unambivalent

(ˌʌnæmˈbɪvələnt)
adj
not ambivalent; certain; clear

un•am•biv•a•lent

(ˌʌn æmˈbɪv ə lənt)

adj.
not ambivalent; definite; certain.
[1940–45]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
While Castiglia finds in temperance fiction "ambivalences" that reveal the persistence of bodily and social desires that will not be repressed, Little's novel is markedly unambivalent about tying temperance activism to explicitly progressive politics, imagining a way that women could throw their support behind temperance and simultaneously refuse to sign up for the political, social, and economic implications the movement accrued (Castiglia 139-40).
Among my favorite pieces is Cherrie Moraga's electrifying dual tribute to Lorde and Pat Parker, the poets who, along with Judy Grahn, she credits with giving "lesbianism a body: a queer body in the original, dangerous, unambivalent sense of the word.
Other students shared a similar experience: an initial shock at the installation's enormity, followed by their expectations of an equally sized, unambivalent message.
He was ten years old when he first met a non-Jew and describes himself as a teenager who "felt unambivalent pleasure about Israeli power.
Wardaddy suffers from existential exhaustion and Luttrell refuses to commit himself wholly to war's violence, but Kyle is unambivalent and unshakeable in his commitment to his duty, whatever violence that leads to.
Thus, it appeared that the term 'navigable' was difficult to define in unambivalent terms, which implied that the alleged extinguishment of Maori titles had taken place on the basis of so-called 'academic' interpretations (Waitangi Tribunal 1993:Section 16.
Younger parents aren't sure that an unambivalent appreciation of America is the right thing to teach modern children.
As with other such passages, this scene of potential empowerment is not unambivalent, suggesting as it does that the sacrifice of psychological autonomy may be needed for Ruth to achieve fuller insight.
although the words evoke memories neither one has ever had: of reaching age in the company of each other; of speech shared and divided bread smoking from the fire; the unambivalent bliss of going home to be at home--the ease of coming back to love begun" (318).
Brown characterizes "left melancholy" as "[Walter] Benjamin's unambivalent epithet for the revolutionary hack who is, finally, attached more to a particular political analysis or ideal-- even to the failure of that ideal--than to seizing possibilities for radical change in the present" (20).
The protectiveness of the father here, his unambivalent care in shielding the child as he introduces him to a new experience, is unique in the sequence.