unban

(redirected from unbanning)

unban

(ʌnˈbæn)
vb (tr)
to allow something that was forbidden before
Translations

unban

[ˈʌnˈbæn] VTlevantar la prohibición de

unban

References in periodicals archive ?
Following the unbanning of the African National Congress (ANC) In July 1991, Ramaphosa was elected secretary general and at the party's leadership core that would negotiate a new constitution with the then National Party government.
This led to the inevitable release of Nelson Mandela and the unbanning of all liberation movements.
Consider a remarkable and controversial speech Reagan gave on the subject in July 1986, in which (among many other things) he called for the release of Mandela and the unbanning of black political parties.
After the banning and unbanning at the Durban International Film Festival, the film had major successes in the global film festival circus, including screenings at the London Film Festival and the Toronto International Film Festival.
de Klerk unbanning the African National Congress had an immediate effect on Anglican Archbishop Desmond Tutu.
While at the now-defunct anti-Apartheid newspaper, SOUTH, in the early 1990s, I witnessed the unbanning of our liberation movements including the African National Congress, the Pan Africanist Congress, the Azanian People's Organization and the South African Communist Party.
It was repealed in 1991, a year after the unbanning of the African National Congress (ANC).
de Klerk, who had come to power in September 1989, announced the unbanning of the ANC, the PAC, and all other anti-apartheid groups.
Critics said the money will be used by Mswati and his 12 wives to fund their lavish lifestyles and will deter him from instituting much needed political reforms and the unbanning of political parties.
Masuku and other campaigners at the news conference said any aid must carry strict terms, including a promise to move towards democracy, the unbanning of political parties and the release of Swaziland's five political prisoners.
The weeks of demonstrations that led the authoritarian Ben Ali to quit in January after 23 years in power opened the way for unprecedented freedoms, including the unbanning of the Islamist party in the secular state.
Furthermore, although there are, today, still extremely racist "Afrikaners", his statement that the parents of the 2007 first year students "upheld, enforced and defended apartheid" is, in my experience, grossly exaggerated: these parents were probably 16 or 17 years old in 1985, 5 years before the unbanning of the ANC and the Communist Party, and the freeing of Nelson Mandela, and obviously still enjoyed the "benefits" of apartheid, but they were certainly not all pro-apartheid activists.