uncanny

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un·can·ny

 (ŭn-kăn′ē)
adj. un·can·ni·er, un·can·ni·est
Mysterious or impossible to explain, especially when causing uneasiness or astonishment. See Synonyms at weird.

[un- + canny, fortunate, safe (obsolete).]

un·can′ni·ly adv.
un·can′ni·ness n.

uncanny

(ʌnˈkænɪ)
adj
1. characterized by apparently supernatural wonder, horror, etc
2. beyond what is normal or expected: an uncanny accuracy.
unˈcannily adv
unˈcanniness n

un•can•ny

(ʌnˈkæn i)

adj.
1. having or seeming to have a supernatural or inexplicable basis; extraordinary: uncanny accuracy; an uncanny knack of spotting an opportunity.
2. mysterious; arousing fear or dread: Uncanny sounds filled the house.
[1590–1600]
un•can′ni•ly, adv.
un•can′ni•ness, n.
syn: See weird.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.uncanny - suggesting the operation of supernatural influencesuncanny - suggesting the operation of supernatural influences; "an eldritch screech"; "the three weird sisters"; "stumps...had uncanny shapes as of monstrous creatures"- John Galsworthy; "an unearthly light"; "he could hear the unearthly scream of some curlew piercing the din"- Henry Kingsley
supernatural - not existing in nature or subject to explanation according to natural laws; not physical or material; "supernatural forces and occurrences and beings"
2.uncanny - surpassing the ordinary or normal; "Beyond his preternatural affability there is some acid and some steel" - George Will; "his uncanny sense of direction"
extraordinary - beyond what is ordinary or usual; highly unusual or exceptional or remarkable; "extraordinary authority"; "an extraordinary achievement"; "her extraordinary beauty"; "enjoyed extraordinary popularity"; "an extraordinary capacity for work"; "an extraordinary session of the legislature"

uncanny

adjective
1. weird, strange, mysterious, queer, unearthly, eerie, supernatural, unnatural, spooky (informal), creepy (informal), eldritch (poetic), preternatural I had this uncanny feeling that Alice was warning me.
2. extraordinary, remarkable, incredible, unusual, fantastic, astonishing, exceptional, astounding, singular, miraculous, unheard-of, prodigious The hero bears an uncanny resemblance to Kirk Douglas.

uncanny

adjective
Of a mysteriously strange and usually frightening nature:
Informal: spooky.
Translations
شاذ، غَريبغَرِيب
podivnýzvláštní
forbløffendeuhyggelig
outohämmästyttävä
sablastan
dularfullurkynleguróhugnanleguróhugnanlegur, kynlegurundarlegur
薄気味悪い
신비로운
nejaukiai
mistiskssavāds
kuslig
แปลกจนไม่สามารถอธิบายได้
kì lạ

uncanny

[ʌnˈkænɪ] ADJ (uncannier (compar) (uncanniest (superl))) (= peculiar) → raro, extraño; (= ghostly) → misterioso
it's quite uncannyes extraordinario
it's uncanny how he does itno llego a comprender cómo lo hace
an uncanny resemblanceun asombroso parecido

uncanny

[ˌʌnˈkæni] adj [knack, ability, feeling, silence] → étrange; [resemblance] → étrange before n, troublant(e); [accuracy] → troublant(e)
He has an uncanny knack of being in the right place at the right time → Il a vraiment le chic pour être au bon endroit au bon moment., Il a ce don étrange d'être toujours au bon endroit au bon moment.
It's uncanny! → C'est troublant!
to bear an uncanny resemblance to sb → ressembler étrangement à qnuncared for [ʌnˈkɛərdfɔːr] adj
(= neglected) [person] → délaissé(e); [building, plant] → à l'abandon
(= unloved) → en mal d'amour

uncanny

adjunheimlich; it’s quite uncannydas ist geradezu unheimlich; to bear an uncanny resemblance to somebodyjdm auf unheimliche Weise ähnlich sehen

uncanny

[ʌnˈkænɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (knack, resemblance) → sconcertante; (sound, silence) → strano/a, inquietante

uncanny

(anˈkӕni) adjective
strange or mysterious. She looks so like her sister that it's quite uncanny.
unˈcannily adverb

uncanny

غَرِيب podivný forbløffende unheimlich μυστηριώδης asombroso outo étrange sablastan inquietante 薄気味悪い 신비로운 griezelig uhyggelig osobliwy estranho сверхъестественный kuslig แปลกจนไม่สามารถอธิบายได้ tekinsiz kì lạ 离奇的
References in classic literature ?
There is a weirdness and uncanniness attaching to them.
Ah, now I see how it is you know Shakespeare and everything, and have learned so much since you left school; which always seemed to me witchcraft before,--part of your general uncanniness," said Lucy.
Chapter seven shifts the focus to anxiety, arguing that many commentators (including Lyons and Taylor) treat it solely as an ontic phenomenon, and thereby occlude its ontological significance--its ability to reveal our uncanniness, our not-being-at-home in the world, which thus potentially discloses God as a possible ground or regrounding of our Being.
The incoherence of narrative time renders the Giaour uncanny, but that uncanniness, which is intensified by the addition of the second account, aligns with the Giaour's estrangement in the first to reinforce the perceptual sense of Islamic inhospitality.
There is an inescapable uneasiness here, an uncanniness sparked by this preservationist mise en abyme, as if as if the set from an earlier and quite different opera had been left standing onstage.
Uncanniness instigates repossession of the self, what Heidegger termed Dasein; it 'triggers those key moments in which Angst brings Dasein face to face with its terrible freedom to be or not to be, to dwell in inauthenticity or strive for self-possession'.
110), but a kind of post-Enlightenment uncanniness remains in the shape of the priest's own ghost in the room, according to Sage.
More often, however, it is the uncanniness, even ominousness, of the sacred "otherness" suffusing the world of nature that Dickinson stresses.
Instead, the installation seemed to open up those processes and systems and the resulting ambiguity of inside and outside, clean and unclean, organic and industrial, familiar and unfamiliar, prompted a sensation of uncanniness and abjection rather than a triumphal circuit of creation or completion.
The uncanniness of Maciste's racial coding--he is (to Italian viewers, at least) at once recognizably Italian and artificially darkened--renders the racial stakes of Libyan conquest visible.
Wells's 1897 novella The Invisible Man is "A Grotesque Romance," and Francoise Duperyron-Lafay demonstrates how Wells's comic touches, particularly incongruous dialogue and narration and ludicrous descriptions of actions and characters, both undermine and place in sharp relief the uncanniness of the tale.
We need only consider the 1798 Alien and Sedition Acts, the Red Scare and Palmer Raids of 1919-1920 (and President Wilson's call to "crush out" the immigrant Americans who had "poured the poison of disloyalty into the very arteries of our national life") (Kennedy 24), the FBI's COINTELPRO program of the 1960s and beyond, as well as our own political climate, to question whether the cold war cultural moment was all that unique, and whether such a thing as "the uncanniness of mid-century America" ever really existed.