unchangeability


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un·change·a·ble

 (ŭn-chān′jə-bəl)
adj.
Not to be altered; immutable: the unchangeable seasons.

un·change′a·bil′i·ty, un·change′a·ble·ness n.
un·change′a·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unchangeability - the quality of being unchangeableunchangeability - the quality of being unchangeable; having a marked tendency to remain unchanged
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
absoluteness - the quality of being absolute; "the absoluteness of the pope's decree could not be challenged"
constancy, stability - the quality of being enduring and free from change or variation; "early mariners relied on the constancy of the trade winds"
innateness - the quality of being innate
irreversibility - the quality of being irreversible (once done it cannot be changed)
invariableness, invariance, invariability - the quality of being resistant to variation
unalterability, fixedness - the quality of being fixed and unchangeable; "the fixedness of his gaze upset her"
unexchangeability - the quality of being incapable of exchange or interchange
immutability, immutableness, fixity - the quality of being incapable of mutation; "Darwin challenged the fixity of species"
References in periodicals archive ?
In The Big Music it is a return to the initial words of the first chapter: to the unchangeability of the landscape--a further take on the constant return so intrinsically part of piobaireachd composition.
Clinton's unchangeability, however, is the source of her uniqueness as a candidate: She's a fixed point.
Given God's unity, unchangeability, immovability, and indestructibility, he is also most stable.
The more dependable types of structural unchangeability for proper names seem to be characteristic to classes of proper names.
We did this with everyone apparently assuming the inexhaustibility of the "natural resources" and unchangeability of the "natural world" on which this way of life depends.
This God of the philosophers, whose eternity and unchangeability had excluded any relation with the changeable and transitory, now appeared to the eye of faith as the God of men, who is not only thought of all thoughts, the eternal mathematics of the universe, but also agape, the power of creative love.
At least since the Counter Reformation, the church had claimed unchangeability so fiercely that it seemed almost a doctrine; the last Council shifted the vertex to the signs of the times.
The assumption of Byzantine society's rigidity and unchangeability stems from the Western European biases due to evaluating Byzantine history in comparison with the political upheavals of medieval Europe.
The consequence is that, as 'we cannot deduce the unchangeability of our mind and of its basic constitution,' it remains possible that 'in a hundred years people will have to think 2 x 2 = 5' or that this proposition is already true for 'living beings with a different mental organization than ourselves' (37).
In turn the unchangeability of the regional distributions of the particular variables in the analyzed period opens a question to what extent it results from the lack of mobility of the factors of the economical growth between the provinces (Malaga & Kliber, 2007).
In place of pious, unthinking acceptance, Nietzsche advocates a relentless inquiry--a characteristic embodied by the so-called "free spirit," (13) that being who has "liberated him/herself from tradition" and from "convictions" of all sorts, as he notes in his Human, All Too Human: "He who has not passed through different convictions but remains in the same belief in whose net he was first captured, is on account of this unchangeability .
He argued that the "superstition of the unchangeability of religion, which had given rise to the legitimation of one group of people ruling over another, had generated another superstition, a superstition that more than all others hinders people from moving from a violent life to a peaceful, loving way of life: the superstition that certain people can and should organize the lives of others" (PSS 38: 89).