unchangeableness


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un·change·a·ble

 (ŭn-chān′jə-bəl)
adj.
Not to be altered; immutable: the unchangeable seasons.

un·change′a·bil′i·ty, un·change′a·ble·ness n.
un·change′a·bly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unchangeableness - the quality of being unchangeableunchangeableness - the quality of being unchangeable; having a marked tendency to remain unchanged
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
absoluteness - the quality of being absolute; "the absoluteness of the pope's decree could not be challenged"
constancy, stability - the quality of being enduring and free from change or variation; "early mariners relied on the constancy of the trade winds"
innateness - the quality of being innate
irreversibility - the quality of being irreversible (once done it cannot be changed)
invariableness, invariance, invariability - the quality of being resistant to variation
unalterability, fixedness - the quality of being fixed and unchangeable; "the fixedness of his gaze upset her"
unexchangeability - the quality of being incapable of exchange or interchange
immutability, immutableness, fixity - the quality of being incapable of mutation; "Darwin challenged the fixity of species"
References in classic literature ?
The ocean, a part of Nature furthest removed in the unchangeableness and majesty of its might from the spirit of mankind, has ever been a friend to the enterprising nations of the earth.
Cadwallader as frog-faced: a man perhaps about two or three and thirty, whose prominent eyes, thin-lipped, downward-curved mouth, and hair sleekly brushed away from a forehead that sank suddenly above the ridge of the eyebrows, certainly gave his face a batrachian unchangeableness of expression.
An individual that fits its setting too securely carries through but does not have any intention to advance (ordinary unchangeableness is pernicious).
The culmination of Psyche's suffering represents the soul achieving the Platonic ideal of wisdom: "[the soul] passes into the other world, the region of purity, and eternity, and immortality, and unchangeableness .
516, 528-29 (1884) (expressing fear that establishing a fixed definition of due process would "stamp upon our jurisprudence the unchangeableness attributed to the laws of the Medes and Persians").
The unifying theme was the unchangeableness of typical women's roles despite the various cultures and geographies that shape the female identity.
and therefore endures without change, owing to the unchangeableness and perfection of the Divine Reason, the Author of nature.