unconscientious


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Related to unconscientious: conscionable, encompassing, expediential, unconsciously

unconscientious

(ˌʌnˌkɒnʃɪˈɛnʃəs)
adj
careless
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unconscientious - not conscientious;
conscientious - guided by or in accordance with conscience or sense of right and wrong; "a conscientious decision to speak out about injustice"
References in periodicals archive ?
We have to be true to ourselves, tap into our conscience and point out not just legally for God's sake the truth deep within us on why we want to destroy the future of our children by living in denial of our unconscientious ways of self-governance.
conduct or the unconscientious exercise of legal rights.
In his 1904 essay, the "old teacher" or the "father," as the new generation of progressive Muslims would refer to Gasprinskiy, (52) criticizes the Muslim intellectuals' unconscientious effort to excel in their professional careers or become cultivated in ways defined by a cosmopolitan high culture filtered through the sensitivities of Russian educated society while failing to promote or even learn about their native culture.
By choosing and planting non gmo seeds organic at home, we're not only ensuring our family's health and safety but also joining the fight against these unconscientious GMO companies.
The state is earnestly determined to fight the phenomenon of spoilt and expired food commodities sold by a small group of unconscientious expatriates," he said.
The unconscientious transporters, swayed by the lust for money, pushed up the fares by many times.
They can also be distorted by unconscientious rationalizations.
He added that all the unconscientious officials who breach the law should be punished regardless of their
It is truly the unfair or unconscientious advantage that is taken of the opportunity created by the innocent party.
The findings deny the existence of any special disability in Bill York, and they acquit Neil York of unconscientious conduct.
8) The other purpose is the restraint of unconscionable conduct or the unconscientious exercise of legal rights.
Cole, it was said, among other things: "It thus appears that what has sometimes been called an equitable estoppel, and sometimes with less propriety an estoppel in pais, is properly and peculiarly a doctrine of equity, originally introduced there to prevent a party from taking a dishonest and unconscientious advantage of his strict legal rights, though now with us, like many other doctrines of equity habitually administered at law.