unconscionable

(redirected from Unconscionability)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.

un·con·scion·a·ble

 (ŭn-kŏn′shə-nə-bəl)
adj.
1. Deserving of moral condemnation: committed an unconscionable act.
2. Beyond reason; excessive: an unconscionable price.

un·con′scion·a·ble·ness n.
un·con′scion·a·bly adv.

unconscionable

(ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbəl)
adj
1. unscrupulous or unprincipled: an unconscionable liar.
2. immoderate or excessive: unconscionable demands.
unˈconscionableness n
unˈconscionably adv

un•con•scion•a•ble

(ʌnˈkɒn ʃə nə bəl)

adj.
1. not restrained by conscience; unscrupulous.
2. excessive; extortionate.
[1555–65]
un•con`scion•a•bil′i•ty, n.
un•con′scion•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unconscionable - lacking a conscienceunconscionable - lacking a conscience; "a conscienceless villain"; "brash, unprincipled, and conscienceless"; "an unconscionable liar"
unconscientious - not conscientious;
2.unconscionable - greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "exorbitant rent"; "extortionate prices"; "spends an outrageous amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "unconscionable spending"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

unconscionable

adjective
1. criminal, unethical, amoral, unprincipled, unfair, unjust He calls the reductions an unconscionable threat to public safety.
2. excessive, outrageous, unreasonable, extreme, extravagant, preposterous, exorbitant, inordinate, immoderate Some child-care centres were charging unconscionable fees.

unconscionable

adjective
1. Lacking scruples or principles:
3. Vastly exceeding a normal limit, as in cost:
Translations

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃnəbl] ADJ (frm)
1. (= disgraceful) [liar] → desvergonzado; [behaviour, crime] → inadmisible
2. (= excessive) → desmedido, desrazonable

unconscionable

adjunerhört; an unconscionable timeeine unerhört lange Zeit, unerhört lange

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbl] adj (liter)
a. (excessive) → eccessivo/a
to be an unconscionable time doing sth → impiegare un tempo eccessivo a fare qc
b. (unprincipled, liar) → spregiudicato/a
References in periodicals archive ?
In the alternative, Plaintiff seeks an order of this Court declaring that the agreements in the forms set out in Exhibits 1 and 2 are invalid, unenforceable, and/or void under the doctrine of unconscionability," the suit added.
The ACCC and the Commonwealth have also appealed the judges failure to find that Uniques system had further features that contributed to the unconscionability of Uniques behaviour.
The Supreme Court expressly noted that, because the trial judge had ruled there was no contract, he had not addressed Dennis' affirmative defense of unconscionability.
One further issue is whether the account agreement that seeks to reduce your client's one-year notice period (usually a dense, multi-page, standardized form) meets the tests of a contract of adhesion and of unconscionability.
66) The constructive trust differs from the resulting trust in that, unlike the resulting trust, where the intention of the transferor is relevant, intention is irrelevant to the constructive trust and in that the concept of unconscionability is central to the latter but has no role to play in the law of resulting trusts.
59) Until fairly recently, there were two controls on the ability to enforce abusive terms through arbitration-- unconscionability and the "Effective Vindication" Doctrine.
Writing for the majority, Justice Scalia invalidated each of these three elements of the Discover Bank rule and dismissed them as non-legitimate requirements to find unconscionability in the contract.
It is because such a party has lost her moral standing to complain that the law, through unconscionability doctrine, bars her from bringing a legal complaint.
Unconscionability is a well-established contract doctrine that says when a contract is grossly unfair in its terms and/or in the manner in which it was procured, it will not be enforced.
According to the Supreme Court, the duty of honest performance is akin to equitable doctrines that impose some form of limitations on the freedom to contract in a manner similar to the doctrine of unconscionability.