unconscionable

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un·con·scion·a·ble

 (ŭn-kŏn′shə-nə-bəl)
adj.
1. Deserving of moral condemnation: committed an unconscionable act.
2. Beyond reason; excessive: an unconscionable price.

un·con′scion·a·ble·ness n.
un·con′scion·a·bly adv.

unconscionable

(ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbəl)
adj
1. unscrupulous or unprincipled: an unconscionable liar.
2. immoderate or excessive: unconscionable demands.
unˈconscionableness n
unˈconscionably adv

un•con•scion•a•ble

(ʌnˈkɒn ʃə nə bəl)

adj.
1. not restrained by conscience; unscrupulous.
2. excessive; extortionate.
[1555–65]
un•con`scion•a•bil′i•ty, n.
un•con′scion•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unconscionable - lacking a conscienceunconscionable - lacking a conscience; "a conscienceless villain"; "brash, unprincipled, and conscienceless"; "an unconscionable liar"
unconscientious - not conscientious;
2.unconscionable - greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "exorbitant rent"; "extortionate prices"; "spends an outrageous amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "unconscionable spending"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

unconscionable

adjective
1. criminal, unethical, amoral, unprincipled, unfair, unjust He calls the reductions an unconscionable threat to public safety.
2. excessive, outrageous, unreasonable, extreme, extravagant, preposterous, exorbitant, inordinate, immoderate Some child-care centres were charging unconscionable fees.

unconscionable

adjective
1. Lacking scruples or principles:
3. Vastly exceeding a normal limit, as in cost:
Translations

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃnəbl] ADJ (frm)
1. (= disgraceful) [liar] → desvergonzado; [behaviour, crime] → inadmisible
2. (= excessive) → desmedido, desrazonable

unconscionable

adjunerhört; an unconscionable timeeine unerhört lange Zeit, unerhört lange

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbl] adj (liter)
a. (excessive) → eccessivo/a
to be an unconscionable time doing sth → impiegare un tempo eccessivo a fare qc
b. (unprincipled, liar) → spregiudicato/a
References in periodicals archive ?
We give the message, too, that individuals all have the same freedom to choose, and that law should not intervene to regulate the choices except in rare cases of unconscionability.
Likewise, many states that have adopted the UPAA changed the rules applicable to challenging the agreement based on unconscionability.
take one example, consider the doctrine of unconscionability.
the Australian considerations of unconscionability do not fit into this
Although contracts of adhesion are well accepted in the law and routinely enforced, the inherent inequality of bargaining power supports an approach to unconscionability that preserves the role of the courts in reviewing the substantive fairness of challenged provisions.
and the general contract doctrine of unconscionability.
Bruhl, The Unconscionability Game: Strategic Judging and the Evolution of Federal Arbitration Law, 83 N.
Shiffrin, "Paternalism, Unconscionability Doctrine, and Accommodation," Philosophy and Public Affairs 29, no.
The boom years facilitated widespread bravado, incompetence and unconscionability in Australian businesses that the finance sector has fostered and nurtured.
The court was also troubled by the issue of unconscionability.
The trial court must consider the totality of the circumstances when determining whether there was procedural unconscionability.