unconscionable

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un·con·scion·a·ble

 (ŭn-kŏn′shə-nə-bəl)
adj.
1. Deserving of moral condemnation: committed an unconscionable act.
2. Beyond reason; excessive: an unconscionable price.

un·con′scion·a·ble·ness n.
un·con′scion·a·bly adv.

unconscionable

(ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbəl)
adj
1. unscrupulous or unprincipled: an unconscionable liar.
2. immoderate or excessive: unconscionable demands.
unˈconscionableness n
unˈconscionably adv

un•con•scion•a•ble

(ʌnˈkɒn ʃə nə bəl)

adj.
1. not restrained by conscience; unscrupulous.
2. excessive; extortionate.
[1555–65]
un•con`scion•a•bil′i•ty, n.
un•con′scion•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unconscionable - lacking a conscienceunconscionable - lacking a conscience; "a conscienceless villain"; "brash, unprincipled, and conscienceless"; "an unconscionable liar"
unconscientious - not conscientious;
2.unconscionable - greatly exceeding bounds of reason or moderation; "exorbitant rent"; "extortionate prices"; "spends an outrageous amount on entertainment"; "usurious interest rate"; "unconscionable spending"
immoderate - beyond reasonable limits; "immoderate laughter"; "immoderate spending"

unconscionable

adjective
1. criminal, unethical, amoral, unprincipled, unfair, unjust He calls the reductions an unconscionable threat to public safety.
2. excessive, outrageous, unreasonable, extreme, extravagant, preposterous, exorbitant, inordinate, immoderate Some child-care centres were charging unconscionable fees.

unconscionable

adjective
1. Lacking scruples or principles:
3. Vastly exceeding a normal limit, as in cost:
Translations

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃnəbl] ADJ (frm)
1. (= disgraceful) [liar] → desvergonzado; [behaviour, crime] → inadmisible
2. (= excessive) → desmedido, desrazonable

unconscionable

adjunerhört; an unconscionable timeeine unerhört lange Zeit, unerhört lange

unconscionable

[ʌnˈkɒnʃənəbl] adj (liter)
a. (excessive) → eccessivo/a
to be an unconscionable time doing sth → impiegare un tempo eccessivo a fare qc
b. (unprincipled, liar) → spregiudicato/a
References in periodicals archive ?
Who the Cap Fit": Unconsciousness and Unconscionableness in the Criticism of Houston A.
consciously assumed the risks," relief on the basis of unconscionableness is not available.
Given the animal lobby's own unconscionableness ("Six million Jews died in concentration camps," PETA founder Ingrid Newkirk once told the Washington Post, "but six billion broiler chickens will die this year in slaughterhouses"), these seem like measured ripostes, and many otherwise animal-loving people relish the angst that such comments doubtless produce among the zoolatrous.