uncontestable


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Related to uncontestable: incontestable

uncontestable

(ˌʌnkənˈtɛstəbəl)
adj
not able to be disputed
References in periodicals archive ?
Howard Johnson staked an uncontestable claim for a place among the elite of British jumps trainers as Inglis Drever gave him a third Cheltenham Festival victory of the week when beating Baracouda in the Ladbrokes World Hurdle.
The problem here is not the uncontestable fact that different values trace their provenance to different theoretical or ideological roots.
The primacy of price priority seems almost an uncontestable proposition.
It is evident that the Ashgate Publishing Company holds the Olympic Gold Medal in Hardy studies by an uncontestable margin of excellence (although one wishes the Notebook of newsclips et al.
As for the attempts (by Sparrow and, less recently, Paul James) to represent objections to "no borders' as a noble defence of a supposedly uncontestable Tibet, authentic Japanese rice farming and indigenous sovereignty, others have written more interesting things on sovereignty than I.
In the Taino, ultimately, they believed they had found an uncontestable validation for their anti-colonialist struggle.
The family of Lucy Gray is hardly a dynasty, but in escaping the father's then uncontestable custody over his children, she empties the household of its most significant metonym of power.
Their recognition of the kur as a form therapy was nor based on any wishy-washy dogma, either, for what seems uncontestable, even among the scientific crowd, is the idea that happy patients often make faster healers.
After a while, though, it becomes an uncontestable pattern and as Sakiri celebrated, the goalkeeper looked justifiably forlorn.
Therefore, the Supreme Court believed that it could make its case by not leaving the terrain of the medical--natural and scientific "brass tacks" that are uncontestable.
Monmonier's basic and uncontestable point is that even well-made maps, in the process of revealing certain kinds of truths, must inevitably distort or obscure others: "To present a useful and truthful picture, an accurate map must tell white lies.