uncontradicted


Also found in: Legal.

uncontradicted

(ˌʌnkɒntrəˈdɪktɪd)
adj
unchallenged
References in classic literature ?
It has until lately been a received and uncontradicted opinion that the prosperity of the people of America depended on their continuing firmly united, and the wishes, prayers, and efforts of our best and wisest citizens have been constantly directed to that object.
ANY OBJECT WHICH REMAINS UNCONTRADICTED IS IPSO FACTO BELIEVED AND POSITED AS ABSOLUTE REALITY.
I conclude, therefore, that there must be belief-feelings of the same order as those of doubt or disbelief, although phenomena closely analogous to those of belief can be produced by mere uncontradicted images.
The hope of eventually clearing himself with them, too, and explaining how he had been forced away, had buoyed him up, and sustained him, under many of his recent trials; and now, the idea that they should have gone so far, and carried with them the belief that the was an impostor and a robber--a belief which might remain uncontradicted to his dying day--was almost more than he could bear.
You may, with your place of retreat unknown, then leave, if you please, uncontradicted by me, the lie that when you passed out of all knowledge but mine, you merited a good name.
I assure you that he won't even let his heart speak uncontradicted.
And as if excited by the sound of her uncontradicted voice, she went so far as to say in a tone almost tart:
a determination that there is not enough evidence to merit a trial -the trial court should consider only the plaintiff's claims and evidence and not weigh even the uncontradicted evidence presented by the publisher defendant.
182) For it seems uncontradicted that punishment, imposed by whomever, can be "unjust treatment" precisely because it is without justification or, in other words, not "proper" punishment.
52) Even though Rockwell presented a small amount of testimony to the contrary, the "essentially uncontradicted evidence" undermined Rockwell's contention that the information was a sufficiently guarded trade secret.
44) The Court also held that a judge must draw all reasonable inferences in favor of the nonmoving party and consider "evidence supporting the moving party that is uncontradicted and unimpeached, at least to the extent that that evidence comes from disinterested witnesses.
The dissenting judge in Kent, who would have awarded higher damages, seems to have held something close to this view, for he described that breach as "either intentional or due to gross neglect which, under the uncontradicted facts, amounted to the same thing.