uncrossable

uncrossable

(ʌnˈkrɒsəbəl)
adj
impassable
References in periodicals archive ?
The ant "must adapt [her] course repeatedly to the difficulties [she] encounters and often detour uncrossable barriers.
it has become an uncrossable bright line--state reapportionment plans
The sepia tones of the opening put him in mind of Teddy travelling some great, uncrossable distance, and when his mother nodded off from the sherry, Mark quietly rose to the rotary phone.
For Berger, the boundary of language in this literary text is uncrossable by conventional means.
The roots of this definite but illiberal perspective reach back at least to the time of Enlightenment philosopher Rene Descartes, who argued that humans are separated from all other living creatures by an uncrossable chasm.
Having to choose between different names for things becomes emblematic of the incomprehensible and perhaps uncrossable breach between brown and white:
Hume didn't think this divide was an uncrossable chasm though.
In one case, the nonpassage resembles an impermeability; it would stem from the opaque existence of an uncrossable border: a door that does not open or that only opens according to an unlocatable condition.
That same optimism had tamped down my knowledge of rivers and the reality of uncrossable water that I'd refused to acknowledge.
Faber tells a beautifully human story of love, loss, faith and the sometimes uncrossable distances between people.
At some points it was only nine feet wide, at others two lanes, but it was the road of legend and a way around the uncrossable Rockies (other than by rail) for the migrations of unemployed or farm-foreclosed victims of the 1930s Dust Bowl and Depression in America.