uncultivated


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un·cul·ti·vat·ed

 (ŭn-kŭl′tə-vā′tĭd)
adj.
1. Not cultivated by standard agricultural methods: uncultivated vegetables; uncultivated ground.
2. Socially unpolished, uncultured, or unrefined.

uncultivated

(ʌnˈkʌltɪˌveɪtɪd)
adj
1. (Agriculture) (of a garden, fields, the earth, etc) not having been tilled and prepared or planted
2. (Horticulture) (of a garden, fields, the earth, etc) not having been tilled and prepared or planted
3. (of a mind, person, etc) not improved by education
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.uncultivated - (of land or fields) not prepared for raising cropsuncultivated - (of land or fields) not prepared for raising crops; "uncultivated land"
cultivated - (of land or fields) prepared for raising crops by plowing or fertilizing; "cultivated land"
2.uncultivated - (of persons) lacking art or knowledgeuncultivated - (of persons) lacking art or knowledge
unrefined - (used of persons and their behavior) not refined; uncouth; "how can a refined girl be drawn to such an unrefined man?"
3.uncultivated - characteristic of a person who is not cultivated or does not have intellectual tastesuncultivated - characteristic of a person who is not cultivated or does not have intellectual tastes; "lowbrow tastes"
nonintellectual - not intellectual

uncultivated

adjective
1. In a primitive state; not domesticated or cultivated; produced by nature:
Translations

uncultivated

[ˈʌnˈkʌltɪveɪtɪd] ADJ
1. (Agr) [land] → sin cultivar, inculto (frm)
2. (= uncultured) [person, mind] → sin cultivar; [voice, accent] → no cultivado

uncultivated

[ˌʌnˈkʌltɪveɪtɪd] adj [land] → inculte

uncultivated

adj landunkultiviert, unbebaut; person, behaviourunkultiviert; mindnicht ausgebildet; talentbrachliegend

uncultivated

[ʌnˈkʌltɪˌveɪtɪd] adjincolto/a
References in classic literature ?
These mountains, as they are uncultivated, are in some parts shaded with large forests, and in others dry and bare.
Never had they witnessed such power of mastication, and such marvellous capacity of stomach, as in this native and uncultivated gastronome.
In the elbow thus formed the country is of varied character, sometimes luxuriantly fertile, and sometimes extremely bare; fields of maize succeeded by wide spaces covered with broom-corn and uncultivated plains.
I met dozens of people, imaginative and unimaginative, cultivated and uncultivated, who had come from far countries and roamed through the Swiss Alps year after year--they could not explain why.
The grand principles of virtue and honour, however they may be distorted by arbitrary codes, are the same all the world over: and where these principles are concerned, the right or wrong of any action appears the same to the uncultivated as to the enlightened mind.
The outskirt of the garden in which Tess found herself had been left uncultivated for some years, and was now damp and rank with juicy grass which sent up mists of pollen at a touch; and with tall blooming weeds emitting offensive smells--weeds whose red and yellow and purple hues formed a polychrome as dazzling as that of cultivated flowers.
Though superior to most children of their years in abilities, they were decidedly behind them in attainments; their manners were uncultivated, and their tempers unruly.
Heathcliff; his thick brown curls were rough and uncultivated, his whiskers encroached bearishly over his cheeks, and his hands were embrowned like those of a common labourer: still his bearing was free, almost haughty, and he showed none of a domestic's assiduity in attending on the lady of the house.
They were not simple, vulgar, unmeaning ornaments, such as the uncultivated seize upon with avidity on account of their florid appearance, but well devised drawings, that were replete with taste and thought, and afforded some apology for the otherwise senseless luxury contemplated, by aiding in refining the imagination, and cultivating the intellect.
All round this garden, in the uncultivated parts, red partridges ran about in conveys among the brambles and tufts of junipers, and at every step of the comte and Raoul a terrified rabbit quitted his thyme and heath to scuttle away to the burrow.
The savage element in humanity--let the modern optimists who doubt its existence look at any uncultivated man (no matter how muscular), woman (no matter how beautiful), or child (no matter how young)--began to show itself furtively in his eyes, to utter itself furtively in his voice.
The foregoing occurrences had struck a spark from the stern tempers of a set of beings so singularly moulded in the habits of their uncultivated lives, which served to keep alive among them the dying embers of family affection.