undepreciated

undepreciated

(ˌʌndɪˈpriːʃɪˌeɪtɪd)
adj
retaining value
References in periodicals archive ?
205-36(b)(2), (a) the gain or loss is the difference between the fair market value on the disposition date and the undepreciated balance at the time of disposition; and (b) the disposition date is the date of the sale and leaseback arrangement; and (2) the government and the contractor shall limit the gain recognized for contract costing purposes to the difference between the acquisition cost (or for assets acquired under a capital lease, the value at which the leased asset is capitalized) of the asset and its undepreciated balance.
Badger did not retire the used pipe or remove its undepreciated costs from the company's books.
To qualify for protection under the large entity safe harbor, large publicly traded companies must have at least $50 million in undepreciated net tangible assets.
For the following four types of dispositions, a taxpayer may segregate the undepreciated cost of a particular asset and calculate an actual gain or loss:
For example, the regulations could provide that tax basis must be used where undepreciated book basis is not within 10 percent of the undepreciated tax basis.
Although the mine took a $45-million write-down on its undepreciated carrying value, contributing to a $39.
Fitch will continue to utilize total debt to undepreciated book capitalization as a secondary leverage measure, and continues to view total debt to total market capitalization as the least useful leverage measure due to limiting factors.
In order for a tenant to obtain a current write-off for undepreciated improvements at the old premises, it is important that the landlord legally assume the tenant's future obligations under the old lease rather than structure the arrangement as a sublease.
Under the double-declining balance method, a rate equal to two divided by the tax life is applied to the undepreciated basis.
6x or lower for several consecutive quarters, (ii) if HR's ratio of total debt to undepreciated book capital were to increase to above 50% for several consecutive quarters, (iii) if total debt to annualized recurring EBITDA were to increase above 8.
Accordingly, it appears that landlords may have a choice when it comes to recovering the undepreciated cost of their tenant improvements that do not constitute structural components.
The problem is that gains tax is measured by the difference between the sales price, including liabilities, and the undepreciated purchase price of the real estate.