under canvas


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can·vas

 (kăn′vəs)
n.
1. A heavy, coarse, closely woven fabric of cotton, hemp, or flax, traditionally used for tents and sails.
2.
a. A piece of such fabric on which a painting, especially an oil painting, is executed.
b. A painting executed on such fabric.
3. A fabric of coarse open weave, used as a foundation for needlework.
4. The background against which events unfold, as in a historical narrative: a grim portrait of despair against the bright canvas of the postwar economy.
5. Nautical A sail or set of sails.
6.
a. A tent or group of tents.
b. A circus tent.
7. Sports The floor of a ring in which boxing or wrestling takes place.
Idiom:
under canvas
1. Nautical With sails spread.
2. In a tent or tents.

[Middle English canevas, from Old French and from Medieval Latin canavāsium, both ultimately from Latin cannabis, hemp; see cannabis.]
Translations
في الخِيام
pod stanem
i telt
sátorban
í tjöldum
pod stanom
çadırda

canvas

(ˈkӕnvəs) plural ˈcanvases noun
1. (also adjective) (of) a coarse cloth made of hemp or flax etc, used for sails, tents etc, and for painting on. canvas sails.
2. (a piece of canvas for) a painting. He painted twenty canvases.
under canvas
in tents. living under canvas.
References in classic literature ?
You boys will have to take your drinks under canvas again, I reckon