underemphasis

un·der·em·pha·size

 (ŭn′dər-ĕm′fə-sīz′)
tr.v. un·der·em·pha·sized, un·der·em·pha·siz·ing, un·der·em·pha·siz·es
To fail to give enough emphasis to.

un′der·em′pha·sis (-sĭs) n.

underemphasis

(ˌʌndərˈɛmfəsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
a lack of emphasis
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References in periodicals archive ?
Some are skeptical of this model, and for reasons that go beyond what some consider an overemphasis on asset management and underemphasis on the business of reinsurance.
2] peak may partly be a function of the underemphasis of UPDRS items on ambulatory function and associated elements of endurance.
But reliance on the criminal law is not the solution and generates many new problems, including racial profiling, unequal treatment of similarly situated defendants, overreliance on (expensive) incarceration, and the underemphasis of other, more important law enforcement goals.
Understatement The presentation of a The slipper was shaped of thing with underemphasis the most precious of in order to achieve a metals.
Although overshadowing, an underemphasis on career issues when
The Holmes County ministers would not tolerate Weavertown's slow response against tobacco and the underemphasis on teaching the new birth (a central emphasis among revivalists) while Weavertown leaders were offended by the accusations against their lifestyle.
To do an entire issue, highlighting the miracles, should quickly dispel the long-entrenched naturalist image the magazine has acquired, especially with its over-emphasis on lawyers and severe underemphasis on the supernatural .
If bottom-up inefficiencies were relatively small, then their underemphasis vis-a-vis top-down costs would be justifiable.
In the tax area, research we cite later indicates an overemphasis on individual taxation and an underemphasis on business taxation.
However, the author also makes the case that Gulf Arab conventional forces are more bark than bite and cites a "massive overemphasis on the procurement of high technology and serious underemphasis on manpower issues, personnel selection, training, and maintenance.
I am nonplused because, in Rae's defense of a social ethics grounded in dualism, he perpetuates this very distinction by observing that his students wonder if "the social mission of the church" has not led to an underemphasis on "the evangelistic mission of the church.
And that'll protect you from all manner of delusion or overemphasis or underemphasis.