underfoot

un·der·foot

 (ŭn′dər-fo͝ot′)
adv.
1. Below or under the foot or feet; against the ground: trampled the plants underfoot.
2. At or under the foot or feet; on the ground: moist, cool, soft grass growing underfoot.
3. Hindering progress; in the way: pets, toys, and children underfoot.

underfoot

(ˌʌndəˈfʊt)
adv
1. underneath the feet; on the ground
2. in a position of subjugation or subservience
3. in the way

un•der•foot

(ˌʌn dərˈfʊt)

adv.
1. under the foot or feet; on the ground or underneath.
2. in the way.
adj.
3. lying under the foot or feet; in a position to be stepped on.
[1150–1200]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.underfoot - under the feetunderfoot - under the feet; "trampled the beans underfoot"; "green grass growing underfoot"
2.underfoot - in the way and hindering progress; "a house with children and pets and toys always underfoot"
Translations
تَحْت القَدَمَيْن
na zemi
undir fæti
po kojomis
apakšāzem kājām
na zemi
ayak altında

underfoot

[ˈʌndəˈfʊt] ADVdebajo de los pies
it's wet underfootel suelo está mojado

underfoot

[ˌʌndərˈfʊt] advsous les pieds
to trample sth underfoot → piétiner qch

underfoot

[ˌʌndəˈfʊt] advsotto i piedi, per terra
to trample underfoot (also) (fig) → calpestare
the children are always getting underfoot → i bambini sono sempre tra i piedi

underfoot

(andəˈfut) adjective
on the ground under the feet of anyone walking. It is not actually raining just now but it is very wet underfoot.
References in classic literature ?
I am a little particular about what I have underfoot.
When the wind blows they whirl crazily about, filling the air and making a car- pet underfoot.
That army, like a herd of cattle run wild and trampling underfoot the provender which might have saved it from starvation, disintegrated and perished with each additional day it remained in Moscow.
The wall, by the touch, was of fine hewn stone; the steps too, though somewhat steep and narrow, were of polished masonwork, and regular and solid underfoot.
Miranda went so far as to say that she wouldn't mind if the Burches came every once in a while, but she was afraid he'd spread abroad the fact of his visit, and missionaries' families would be underfoot the whole continual time.
She went stealthily as a cat through this profusion of growth, gathering cuckoo-spittle on her skirts, cracking snails that were underfoot, staining her hands with thistle-milk and slug-slime, and rubbing off upon her naked arms sticky blights which, though snow-white on the apple-tree trunks, made madder stains on her skin; thus she drew quite near to Clare, still unobserved of him.
Dismounted warriors were trampled underfoot in the stampede which followed.
Little by little the scene grew plain: towering, black buildings here and there, long rows of shops and sheds, little railways branching everywhere, bare gray cinders underfoot and oceans of billowing black smoke above.
Then, before they knew it, came want,-- want in all its horror, indifferent to its rags, treading underfoot all human sentiments.
Slowly the gray light came stealing through the gloom, imperceptibly at first, so that it was almost with surprise that they noticed the vague loom of the trail underfoot.
As soon as thou art awake dig up the ground underfoot, and thou shalt find a bow of brass and three arrows of lead.
All that time he heard nothing but the sound of a million little waters, overhead from the trees, and underfoot along the ground, soaking through the pine-needles, dripping from the tongues of draggled fern, and spouting in newly-torn muddy channels down the slopes.