underinvest

underinvest

(ˌʌndərɪnˈvɛst)
vb (intr)
(Banking & Finance) to invest or lay out insufficient money with the expectation of profit
References in periodicals archive ?
Mr Corbyn said: "Are we going to continue to be grotesquely unequal, underfund our public services, underpay our workers and underinvest in our infrastructure?
In describing the value of Professional Military Education (PME), General Dempsey has said, "We can't underinvest in professional military education or we will suffer challenges in the future.
Since credit unions face such onerous restrictions on the size of their loan portfolios, it's natural and even proper that many underinvest in the IT systems necessary to support small business.
In the drive to control costs, many of your prospects will underinvest in the results they need.
The authors' analysis suggests that Indian farmers, on average, underinvest at planting time.
Accurate data is needed for short-term and long-term capacity planning to ensure IT does not overinvest or underinvest in power and cooling infrastructure.
Surowiecki, for example, argues that "the economics of alternative energy are such that private investors, left to their own devices, are bound to underinvest in it.
The reason the firm will underinvest in this situation has to do with who makes investment decisions and who reaps the benefits of the investments.
When firms face a high probability of default, they tend to underinvest, a distortion known as "debt overhang.
By the same token, more productive firms are more likely to underinvest.
As such, some industry economists and experts argue that a federal government role is needed because industry may underinvest in oil and natural gas R&D.
They understand that one of the biggest mistakes they made as a business community was to underinvest in the university that serves their capital city and the entire center of the state.