underinvest

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underinvest

(ˌʌndərɪnˈvɛst)
vb (intr)
(Banking & Finance) to invest or lay out insufficient money with the expectation of profit
References in periodicals archive ?
The Ebola and Zika virus disease outbreaks are a wakeup call to all African Governments and partners that we have been underinvesting in public health care systems in Africa, said President Adesina at a high-level panel debate on Universal Health Coverage in Africa at the recent Sixth Tokyo International Conference on African Development (TICAD VI) in Nairobi.
Its rivals, who pay to piggyback the network, accuse BT of underinvesting in Openreach for years.
Firms like ours need to collaborate with developers and investment funds to address the critical shortage of available real estate, and make sure that the impact of underinvesting now is understood in the context of maintaining a long term sustainable position as the place to be for manufacturers and distributors.
The problem is compounded by the fact that most governments (the US is a stark case) are chronically underinvesting in long-term education, skill training, and infrastructure.
Among a number of other findings, respondents around the world believe their governments are largely underinvesting in the infrastructure--both social and physical--that cities need to successfully adapt to their future population demographics.
Privatizers are also notorious for underinvesting in the infrastructure needed both to supply fresh water and to provide adequate sewers and protection from storm surges.
The UK is currently underinvesting by a widening margin relative to many other western economies - France's investment in R&D outstrips the UK's by nearly 40%.
Myth: We're massively underinvesting in aging highways and bridges.
A net 63 per cent believe that companies are underinvesting, down from last month's high of a net 67 per cent.
So the science lobby is right - the UK is underinvesting in R&D and innovation, but the solution is not more academic research funding, but rather the restructuring of the UK economy towards encouraging innovative companies with strong links to our world-class academic research with a long-term agenda.
As a result, all Californians will continue to pay for the long-term consequences of underinvesting in children's health, education, and overall well-being.
He noted MySpace ultimately failed because it focused too much on making money while underinvesting in R and D.