undermanning

undermanning

(ˌʌndəˈmænɪŋ)
n
the condition of not having enough employees to function properly
Translations

undermanning

[ˌʌndəˈmænɪŋ] Nfalta f de personal or mano de obra suficiente

undermanning

[ˌʌndərˈmænɪŋ] nsous-effectif m, manque m de personnel
References in periodicals archive ?
Patrick Mercer, a former commanding officer of the Worcestershire and Sherwood Foresters and ex-shadow Security Minister, said the "evil" of undermanning was so acute that units were deploying on operations at a non-combat effective strength.
The figures were revealed by defence minister Bob Ainsworth, who blamed undermanning and too many commitments.
It is all very well to sit back and complain about undermanning in the force and the lack of the proverbial bobby on the beat.
I CAN'T seem to grasp the Government's concerns as to the undermanning of our armed forces to police countries with which they have a conflict of interest.
A source said last night: "It was a flashpoint due to the stress and pressure brought about by undermanning.
Internal reports have shown lengthy periods when the unit has been unable to offer a rescue co-ordinating service, due to undermanning.
We are highly critical of the force in not responding early enough to the recruitment problem, the consequences of which are seen in undermanning throughout the force area.
What I do have a problem with is the level of undermanning that figure suggests.
While they moan about red tape, poor equipment, lack of support from the courts, undermanning and underfunding, all too often this is little more than an excuse for armchair policing.