undernutrition


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un·der·nu·tri·tion

 (ŭn′dər-no͞o-trĭsh′ən, -nyo͞o-)
n.
Inadequate nutrition resulting from lack of food or failure of the body to absorb or assimilate nutrients properly.

undernutrition

(ˌʌndənjuːˈtrɪʃən)
n
(Biology) a deficiency of nutrients
Translations

un·der·nu·tri·tion

a. desnutrición, malnutrición.
References in periodicals archive ?
The bill would prioritized poor families residing in 'high prevalence of undernutrition,' as identified by the National Household Targeting System.
Tenders are invited for Tackling Maternal and Children Undernutrition Programme in Zambia
In the NENA region, multiple forms of malnutrition coexist, with countries experiencing simultaneously child undernutrition, anaemia and obesity.
Historically, maternal anaemia and child undernutrition have been seen as separate problems to obesity and non-communicable diseases," said Jessica Fanzo, a professor at Johns Hopkins University in the United States who co-led the Global Nutrition Report.
Muscle wasting is one of the major features of undernutrition in cirrhosis and currently high resolution image-based techniques such as computed tomography constitute the best way to evaluate body composition in these patients," Montano-Loza added.
Worse, malnutrition and undernutrition are part of a cruel cycle, in that they are both causes and effects of poverty.
Speakers reiterated that socioeconomic factors (poverty, illiteracy, lack of awareness about danger signs of pregnancy, lack of antenatal care, malnutrition, undernutrition, lack of family planning services and non availability of trained birth attendants) were equally responsible for maternal deaths.
The implications for the future of countries are frightening … undernutrition is declining, but overnutrition is expected to become the largest social and economic burden in the region," the U.
Undernutrition remains a major public health concern for many developing nations, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa.
The level of undernutrition in children remains unacceptable throughout the world, with 90% of the developing world's chronically undernourished (stunted) children living in Asia and Africa.
The World Health Organization has estimated that climate change is expected to lead to approximately 250,000 additional deaths per year between 2030 and 2050 due to heat exposure in elderly people, diarrhea, malaria, and childhood undernutrition.
Because it is associated with long-term processes, it reflects chronic forms of undernutrition, and it is, therefore, a good indicator of chronic undernutrition, having been used in several surveys on child nutrition (1-3).