underreact

un·der·re·act

 (ŭn′dər-rē-ăkt′)
intr.v. un·der·re·act·ed, un·der·re·act·ing, un·der·re·acts
To react with insufficient enthusiasm, force, or emphasis.

un′der·re·ac′tion n.

underreact

(ˌʌndərɪˈækt)
vb (intr)
to react with less intensity than is expected or is suitable
References in periodicals archive ?
I guess the fundamental difference is that I think that it is far more likely that France in 2015 will overreact to these attacks than underreact to them.
2004) suggest that because R&D expenditures usually convey intangible information, investors tend to underreact to the R&D-investing firm's stock price.
Their results show that analysts tend to underreact to performance measures that have significant predictive ability for future earnings of wireless firms: customer acquisition cost, average revenue per user, and the number of subscribers.
These statistics indicate the voters underreact to wins by low-ranked teams, and overreact to losses by top-ranked teams.
117) Similarly, markets may systematically overreact or underreact to different types of information.
Stefano Giglio, University of Chicago and NBER, and Kelly Shue, University of Chicago, "No News is News: Do Markets Underreact to Nothing?
underreact to taxes due to salience and those who underreact due to lack
This suggests that, as with equity offerings, investors tend to underreact to the information contained in the announcement, so that the full impact of the CB issue is only recognized over a longer time horizon
You can't overreact or underreact in any situation.
As a result, investors tend to overreact to private information signals and underreact to public information signals.
Generating a rapidly changing environment--that is, engaging in activity that is so quick it is disorienting and appears uncertain or ambiguous to the enemy--inhibits the adversary's ability to adapt and causes confusion and disorder that, in turn, causes an adversary to overreact or underreact .
Cohen and Frazzini (2006) argue that in the market in which all participants are potential recipients of news, investors underreact to news from economically linked firms.