undersong

undersong

(ˈʌndəˌsɒŋ)
n
1. (Music, other) an accompanying secondary melody
2. a nuanced meaning
References in periodicals archive ?
Though Another Day in the Death of America is not about race per se, race is the undersong heard faintly everywhere in its pages.
to noon), is a canonical hour that holds a lesser position in the overall canonical scheme and thus is sometimes called "the undersong.
The above exchange pivots on the following meaning components: TUNE (S1 = melody, tone; correct musical pitch, S2 = temper, mood), LIGHT (S1 = as in light o'love, the name of a popular dance-tune, S2 = not heavy, S3 = wanton, promiscuous), BURDEN (S1 = bass part or undersong, S2 = heavy load), BARNS (S1 = large farm buildings, S2 = children), H/(ACHE) (S1 = letter of the alphabet/S2 = pain, soreness), STUFFED (S1 = having a heavy cold, S2 = having had sexual intercourse resulting in impregnation), BENEDICTUS/(BENEDICK) (S1 = [in full carduus benedictus (Eng.
In The Anxiety of Influence, Bloom notes, "there is an undersong of foreboding.
A soft, harmonious music, full and rare, Murmurs the boughs along-The voice of Nature's God is solemn there, In that deep undersong.
That is the undersong of the biography: Shakespeare made his way by assuring patrons of his Catholic sympathies.
3) In scanning these poems, I am using a metrical notation developed in my doctoral dissertation, "Coleridge and the Undersong of Meter," which combines elements derived from prosodists Derek Attridge, George Wright, and Vladimir Nabokov.
However hard they might scream yes, yes to American culture, there was also an undersong, an unconscious will, "expressing that part of the American psyche which rejects the qualities and the tenants of modern life, which rejects 'Americanism' itself.
The oppressively "taming" undersong of the pastoral idyll blossoms and inflates to become more visible and more threatening.
William Wordsworth's famous coinage for the earth's natural undersong, "the language of the sense" (1.
Humor is also the manifest chord of two mock-essays by alter-ego "John Towne," whose undersong is a profound commitment to high standards.
Am I wrong to think that these are especially American and capitalist metaphors, carrying an undersong of adventure, of risk and speed and danger, of entrepreneurs or starfleet commanders or homesteaders braving the wilderness?