undertaker


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un·der·tak·er

 (ŭn′dər-tā′kər)
n.
2. (ŭn′dər-tā′kər) One who undertakes a task or job.

undertaker

(ˈʌndəˌteɪkə)
n
(Professions) a person whose profession is the preparation of the dead for burial or cremation and the management of funerals; funeral director

un•der•tak•er

(ˈʌn dərˌteɪ kər for 1; ˌʌn dərˈteɪ kər for 2 )

n.
2. a person who undertakes something.
[1350–1400]

undertaker

mortician
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.undertaker - one whose business is the management of funeralsundertaker - one whose business is the management of funerals
embalmer - a mortician who treats corpses with preservatives
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills

undertaker

noun funeral director, mortician (U.S.) I went out of the room to telephone a doctor and an undertaker.
Translations
حانوتي يُجَهِّز المَوْتى للدَّفنحَانُوتِيّ
pracovník pohřebního ústavuzřízenec pohřebního ústavu
bedemand
hautausurakoitsija
pogrebnik
útfararstjóri
葬儀屋
장의사
pracovník pohrebného ústavu
pogrebnik
begravningsentreprenör
สัปเหร่อ
cenaze kaldırıcısıcenaze levazımatçısı
người làm dịch vụ mai táng

undertaker

[ˈʌndəˌteɪkəʳ] N (= director) → director(a) m/f de funeraria or pompas fúnebres; (= employee) → empleado/a m/f de una funeraria
the undertaker'sla funeraria

undertaker

[ˈʌndərteɪkər] nentrepreneur m des pompes funèbres, croque-mort m

undertaker

n(Leichen)bestatter(in) m(f); (= company)Bestattungs- or Beerdigungsinstitut nt

undertaker

[ˈʌndəˌteɪkəʳ] nimpresario di pompe funebri

undertake

(andəˈteik) verbpast tense ˌunderˈtook (-ˈtuk) past participle ˌunderˈtaken
1. to accept (a duty, task, responsibility etc). He undertook the job willingly.
2. to promise (eg to do something). He has undertaken to appear at the police court tomorrow.
ˈundertaker (-teikə) noun
a person who organizes funerals.
ˌunderˈtaking noun
1. a task or piece of work. I didn't realize what a large undertaking this job would be.
2. a promise. He made an undertaking that he would pay the money back.

undertaker

حَانُوتِيّ zřízenec pohřebního ústavu bedemand Leichenbestatter εργολάβος κηδειών director de pompas funebres, director de pompas fúnebres hautausurakoitsija entrepreneur des pompes funèbres pogrebnik impresario di pompe funebri 葬儀屋 장의사 begrafenisondernemer begravelsesbyrå przedsiębiorca pogrzebowy agente funerário гробовщик begravningsentreprenör สัปเหร่อ cenaze levazımatçısı người làm dịch vụ mai táng 丧事承办人
References in classic literature ?
Bumble, tapping the undertaker on the shoulder, in a friendly manner, with his cane.
AN Undertaker Who Was a Member of a Trust saw a Man Leaning on a Spade, and asked him why he was not at work.
Those who will may follow his remains to the grave, whither they were borne on the appointed day, in the most becoming manner, the family in black coaches, with their handkerchiefs up to their noses, ready for the tears which did not come; the undertaker and his gentlemen in deep tribulation; the select tenantry mourning out of compliment to the new landlord; the neighbouring gentry's carriages at three miles an hour, empty, and in profound affliction; the parson speaking out the formula about "our dear brother departed.
Towards the middle of the day the undertaker come with his man, and they set the coffin in the middle of the room on a couple of chairs, and then set all our chairs in rows, and borrowed more from the neighbors till the hall and the parlor and the dining-room was full.
Then he went to an undertaker whose shop he passed every day on his way to the hospital.
The undertaker, instructed to spare no expense, provided long-tailed black horses, with black palls on their backs and black plumes upon their foreheads; coachmen decorated with scarves and jack-boots, black hammercloths, cloaks, and gloves, with many hired mourners, who, however, would have been instantly discharged had they presumed to betray emotion, or in any way overstep their function of walking beside the hearse with brass-tipped batons in their hands.
I attended to all the ghastly formalities, and the urbane undertaker proved that his staff was afflicted, or blessed, with something of his own obsequious suavity.
The face, as it showed under the glass, was not disagreeable to look upon: it bore a faint smile, and as the death had been painless, had not been distorted beyond the repairing power of the undertaker.
I have known ambition, when cured at court by frequent disappointments (which are the only physic for it), to break out again in a contest for foreman of the grand jury at an assizes; and have heard of a man who had so far conquered avarice, as to give away many a sixpence, that comforted himself, at last, on his deathbed, by making a crafty and advantageous bargain concerning his ensuing funeral, with an undertaker who had married his only child.
It reminded me too painfully of that San Francisco undertaker who used to go to sick-beds with his watch in his hand and time the corpse.
Let us endeavor so to live that when we come to die even the undertaker will be sorry.
Nothing, except that the head undertakers shall ride together, as is usual.