undertime

undertime

(ˈʌndəˌtaɪm)
n
(Industrial Relations & HR Terms) informal the time spent by an employee at work in non-work-related activities like socializing, surfing the internet, making personal telephone calls, etc
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References in periodicals archive ?
The two-hour difference was not counted as undertime by the Civil Service Commission.
The best contact center resourcing algorithms are staffing optimization prescriptive models, which prescribe the best hiring, overtime, undertime, and controllable shrinkage plans that meet servicing objectives at least cost.
The best staffing models are integer programming based and include the ability to produce just-in-time hiring, overtime/ undertime, and controllable shrinkage plans.
These models prescribe the best hiring, overtime, undertime, and controllable shrinkage plans that meet servicing objectives at least cost.
WORCESTER - At this summer's annual league meetings, the Sharks should submit a rule change calling for undertime.
Baird Callicott, Do Deconstructive Ecology and Sociobiology Undertime Leopold's Land Ethic?
If they observed our personnel departments, they would hear about paid hours, time-sheet hours, vacation time, sick time, holiday time, overtime, undertime, lost time, compensatory time, time-in-grade, and soon.
All of these proposals were ultimately dismissed on the grounds that they were not financially feasible, would undertime the fight for equality, and were divisive, distinguishing women from men rather than uniting all workers around the fight to improve the working environment.
The President also frowned on government workers who go undertime.
BOSTON - Baseball is the only sport that embraces the concept of undertime, and it cost the Red Sox a game last night.