unenforceable


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unenforceable

(ˌʌnɪnˈfɔːsəbəl)
adj
not able to be imposed or enforced
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unenforceable - not enforceable; not capable of being brought about by compulsion; "an unenforceable law"; "unenforceable reforms"
enforceable - capable of being enforced
Translations

unenforceable

adj lawnicht durchsetzbar; policyundurchführbar
References in periodicals archive ?
1 The Unfair Terms in Consumer Contracts Regulations 1999 These regulations set out what makes a contract term unfair - and therefore unenforceable.
court to declare two Nichia patents invalid, unenforceable and improperly issued by the U.
the 2nd Circuit reaffirmed its decision that an American Express credit card agreement containing a pre-dispute arbitration agreement with a provision that required consumers to waive their right to pursue class action claims was unenforceable.
At a meeting of the county council's North area committee in December, Bill Grisdale of Alnwick Town Council raised the issue of vehicles parking in the Market Place, and rumours that the previous ban had either been lost or was unenforceable.
The McGinnises moved to dismiss, arguing that the oral contract alleged in Count II violated the Home Repair and Remodeling Act and was therefore unenforceable.
If the lender fails to give the information, the debt becomes unenforceable, meaning the lender cannot get a court judgment against the borrower, take back hired items or things bought on credit or anything that was used as a security.
If the lender fails to provide the requested information, the debt becomes unenforceable, meaning the lender cannot get a court judgment against the borrower, take back hired items or things bought on credit or anything that was used as a security, such as a car.
Summary: Asserts Defenses That The '439 Patent Is Invalid, Unenforceable and Not Infringed
They make wild claims that most credit agreements are unenforceable.
AP) -- Faculty at Bergen Community College have balked at a proposed conduct code for students and teachers, calling it unconstitutional and unenforceable.
Parliament made no provision for the extra costs, from which it can only be concluded that the legislation is indeed unenforceable.
Tim Langley, a partner in the specialist automotive unit at solicitors Blakemores, says finance companies and dealers need to be very careful to ensure the provisions of the new Act are observed so as to avoid being left with agreements which are unenforceable or rewritten by the courts.