unentitled


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unentitled

(ˌʌnɪnˈtaɪtəld)
adj
not being entitled; not having a right
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unentitled - having no right or entitlement; "a distinction to which he was unentitled"
ineligible - not eligible; "ineligible to vote"; "ineligible for retirement benefits"
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References in periodicals archive ?
The acquisition further included a joint venture interest in an existing multifamily community located in Katy, TX, additional commercial land within six distinct projects, and 730 acres of unentitled land in Southern California.
This acquisition includes a joint venture interest in an existing multifamily community located in Katy, TX, additional commercial land within six distinct projects, and 730 acres of unentitled land in Southern California.
In prayer, they knew and truly understood who they were-unworthy, undeserving, and unentitled servants-and that is why they were able to offer themselves, their sufferings, mortifications, and sacrifices willingly and joyfully to God and to His people.
And the students are so unentitled and just wonderful to work with.
2012) (holding common law collateral source rule in Texas denies recovery of unentitled expenses).
And Ben Stiller, in "Zoolander," turned media-age vanity into a rowdy burlesque of grossly unentitled entitlement.
Essential capabilities in DgSecure include the industry-first ability to detect sensitive data regardless of its data type or location, define its relationship to other data, prevent unentitled access and provide monitoring for complete data privacy assurance.
In deciding the invalidity of the contract, the contracting parties shall return the received amounts pursuant to the provision on refund of unentitled amounts at Article 321 of the Civil Transactions Law.
R) 101 (bailee returning to unentitled bailor: liability to third party founded on notice of third party's claim).
Divergently, men report feelings of exclusion and disconnection from treatment processes; being unentitled to their own stress reactions (especially when their partners are subjected to the majority of the medical interventions); and discordance with the support-givers' role (Berg, et al.