unexceptionable


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un·ex·cep·tion·a·ble

 (ŭn′ĭk-sĕp′shə-nə-bəl)
adj.
Beyond any reasonable objection; irreproachable.

un′ex·cep′tion·a·bly adv.
Usage Note: The adjectives unexceptionable and unexceptional are sometimes confused. Unexceptionable is derived from the word exception in its sense "objection," as in the idiom take exception. Thus unexceptionable means "not open to any objection": "By the end of the 1930's ... the prohibition against makeup had been lifted, and powder, lipstick, mascara and rouge had become unexceptionable parts of the beauty arsenal" (Liesl Schillinger). Unexceptional, in contrast, generally means "not exceptional, not varying from the usual": "His physical appearance must have been unexceptional, since few of those who knew him firsthand can recall anything about how he looked, other than the fact that he was small" (Daniel B. Silver).

unexceptionable

(ˌʌnɪkˈsɛpʃənəbəl)
adj
beyond criticism or objection
ˌunexˈceptionableness, ˌunexˌceptionaˈbility n
ˌunexˈceptionably adv

un•ex•cep•tion•a•ble

(ˌʌn ɪkˈsɛp ʃə nə bəl)

adj.
not offering any basis for objection; beyond criticism.
[1655–65]
un`ex•cep′tion•a•ble•ness, n.
un`ex•cep′tion•a•bly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unexceptionable - completely acceptable; not open to exception or reproach; "two unexceptionable witnesses"; "a judge's ethics should be unexceptionable"
acceptable - worthy of acceptance or satisfactory; "acceptable levels of radiation"; "performances varied from acceptable to excellent"
Translations

unexceptionable

[ˌʌnɪkˈsepʃnəbl] ADJintachable, irreprochable

unexceptionable

adjeinwandfrei; personsolide

unexceptionable

[ˌʌnɪkˈsɛpʃnəbl] (frm) adj (behaviour) → irreprensibile; (style) → ineccepibile; (speech) → inappuntabile
References in classic literature ?
Weston was a man of unexceptionable character, easy fortune, suitable age, and pleasant manners; and there was some satisfaction in considering with what selfdenying, generous friendship she had always wished and promoted the match; but it was a black morning's work for her.
I expected to find her temper hasty, but it was not so--her behavior was unexceptionable.
Though this provision has been assailed, on different grounds, with no small degree of vehemence, I scruple not to declare my firm persuasion, that it is one of the best digested and most unexceptionable parts of the plan.
A fifth is of opinion that a bill of rights of any sort would be superfluous and misplaced, and that the plan would be unexceptionable but for the fatal power of regulating the times and places of election.
I had it there now before my eyes, bearing upon it the unexceptionable testimony of its catastrophe.
Wild eyes, the iris of which contracts or dilates at pleasure," said Debray; "facial angle strongly developed, magnificent forehead, livid complexion, black beard, sharp and white teeth, politeness unexceptionable.
Then, of course, I might refashion life and character entirely after my own liking; I might select the most unexceptionable type of clergyman and put my own admirable opinions into his mouth on all occasions.
To tell the truth, Mehevi was indebted to the excellence of his viands for the honour of my repeated visits--a matter which cannot appear singular, when it is borne in mind that bachelors, all the world over, are famous for serving up unexceptionable repasts.
The Haunted House," by the same author, is one of the truest poems ever written,--one of the truest, one of the most unexceptionable, one of the most thoroughly artistic, both in its theme and in its execution.
Sir Walter spurned the idea of its being offered in any manner; forbad the slightest hint being dropped of his having such an intention; and it was only on the supposition of his being spontaneously solicited by some most unexceptionable applicant, on his own terms, and as a great favour, that he would let it at all.
Vernon, to whom her own behaviour was far from unexceptionable, might for a time make her wish for retirement.
Renfrew, the colonel's widow, was not only unexceptionable in point of breeding, but also interesting on the ground of her complaint, which puzzled the doctors, and seemed clearly a case wherein the fulness of professional knowledge might need the supplement of quackery.