unfruitful

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un·fruit·ful

 (ŭn-fro͞ot′fəl)
adj.
1. Not bearing fruit or offspring; barren.
2. Not productive of a good or useful result.

un·fruit′ful·ly adv.
un·fruit′ful·ness n.

unfruitful

(ʌnˈfruːtfʊl)
adj
1. barren, unproductive, or unprofitable
2. (Botany) failing to produce or develop into fruit
unˈfruitfully adv
unˈfruitfulness n

un•fruit•ful

(ʌnˈfrut fəl)

adj.
1. not providing satisfaction; unprofitable; unrewarding: an unfruitful search for gold.
2. not producing offspring; sterile.
3. not bearing fruit or harvest; barren: an unfruitful tree.
[1350–1400]
un•fruit′ful•ly, adv.
un•fruit′ful•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unfruitful - not fruitfulunfruitful - not fruitful; not conducive to abundant production
infertile, sterile, unfertile - incapable of reproducing; "an infertile couple"
fruitful - productive or conducive to producing in abundance; "be fruitful and multiply"

unfruitful

adjective
1. Unable to produce offspring:
2. Lacking or unable to produce growing plants or crops:
Translations

unfruitful

[ˈʌnˈfruːtfʊl] ADJinfructuoso

unfruitful

adj soil, woman, discussionunfruchtbar; attemptfruchtlos
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding whether the fact that the abortion or the relinquishing of the subject is, in the end, achieved or not, stands for an exercise in futility, as the ultimate goal of the narrative instance, the concoction of the text, has already been concluded and the inspirational status had conquered the unfruitfulness of the dying imagination, and that of the self.
During the meeting, in addition to emphasizing the unfruitfulness of the military approach in the region, Iran's view about the need for distancing the region from war and strengthening the political process was again underlined and it was announced that talks and effective cooperation is the most important factor to get rid of the regional problems and reaching sustainable collective security," he added.
The early Christian scholar Origen wrote: "It is demons which produce famine, unfruitfulness, corruptions of the air, pestilences; they hover concealed in clouds in the lower atmosphere, and are attracted by the blood and incense which the heathen offer to them as gods.