ungentle


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ungentle

(ʌnˈdʒɛntəl)
adj
not gentle
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.ungentle - not of the nobilityungentle - not of the nobility; "of ignoble (or ungentle) birth"; "untitled civilians"
lowborn - of humble birth or origins; "a topsy-turvy society of lowborn rich and blue-blooded poor"
References in classic literature ?
THE ungentle laws and customs touched upon in this tale are historical, and the episodes which are used to illustrate them are also historical.
So you must try to be contented with making your name boyish, and playing brother to us girls," said Beth, stroking the rough head with a hand that all the dish washing and dusting in the world could not make ungentle in its touch.
In a short pause which ensued, she had a fancy that she felt Miss Betsey touch her hair, and that with no ungentle hand; but, looking at her, in her timid hope, she found that lady sitting with the skirt of her dress tucked up, her hands folded on one knee, and her feet upon the fender, frowning at the fire.
Yet prejudices so obstinate have not made him an ungentle or impracticable companion.
At length, however, the boisterous pastime terminated, suddenly, as might be expected: the little one was hurt, and began to cry; and the ungentle play-fellow tossed it into its mother's lap, bidding her 'make all straight.
One was annoyed because his left pedal had come off, and the other because his tyre had become deflated, small and indeed negligible accidents by Bun Hill standards, due entirely to the ungentle handling of the delicate machines entrusted to them--and they failed to see clearly how they put themselves in the wrong by this method of argument.
Aristotle wrote of it similarly in his books on the generation of the animals, (33) although another is added; this is the rigid and the flexible, meaning by the former the ungentle (I am constrained to call it that for lack of a proper word) [22] and the gentle by the latter.
MARCUS: Speak, gentle niece, what stern ungentle hands Have lopp'd and hew'd and made thy body bare Of her two branches, those sweet ornaments--
Honigmann, Shakespeare: the 'lost years' (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1985); Stephen Greenblatt, Will in the World: How Shakespeare Became Shakespeare (New York: Norton, 2004); Bill Bryson, Shakespeare: The World as Stage (New York: Harper Collins, 2007); Rene Weis, Shakespeare Unbound: Decoding a Secret Life (New York: Henry Holt, 2007); Jonathan Bate, The Soul of the Age: The Life, Mind and World of William Shakespeare (London, New York: Viking, 2008), and Katherine Duncan-Jones, Shakespeare: An Ungentle Life (London: Methuen, 2010).
93-4, emphasis mine), he merely echoes Marcus's previous question to his niece: 'what stern ungentle hands/hath lopped and hewed and made thy body bare/ of her two branches .
The quadripartita ratio fell out of fashion because it appears overly schematic and may, in ungentle hands, become unnecessarily obsessed with classification.
However, against this definition Tolstoy severely accuses Lear of his sudden and whimsical division of the kingdom at the very beginning of the play without any preparatory explanations of his motives, and he also charges Cordelia for her ungentle language unlike that of an obedient daughter, whom she is assumed to be throughout the whole play.