unhealable


Also found in: Legal.

unhealable

(ʌnˈhiːləbəl)
adj
not able to be healed
References in periodicals archive ?
Prosecutors accused the suspect of assaulting the Ghanaian and causing him a permanent and unhealable disfigurement in his face.
Many commentators licked their lips at the prospect of unhealable rifts following what they insisted would be the 'inevitable' remain vote - rifts that would threaten the future of Conservatism.
He is helpless not to consider all possible avenues of human engagement, all possible variations of narrative flow, improvising discipline and flaw, genius and torment, what Williams calls in "Dissections" "this unhealable self in myself.
It is the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted.
Recalling writing to Prime Minister Modi over the issue seeking action on the Tamil Nadu Assembly resolution, she said that the Central government has not taken any positive steps over this issue has caused unhealable wound.
Therefore, Darwish employs beauty in a therapeutic way by assigning it the task to heal the unhealable wounds from within.
The plight of outcast members and exiles, as Said (1991) hauntingly reminds us, "is the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted" (357).
But it is probably the account that Julia gives of her father that constitutes the most dramatic example of linguistic and territorial dislocation, of what Edward Said has called "the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home" (200K 173).
Exile is 'the unhealable rift forced between a human being and a native place, between the self and its true home: its essential sadness can never be surmounted (Said, cited in Ibrahim 1996, p.
Edward Said describes exile as "the unhealable rift forced between a human and a native place, between the self and its true home," and he concludes that "its essential sadness can never be surmounted" (173).
Was she both a willing expatriate and an exile, who suffered what Edward Said has described as 'the unhealable rift', the 'essential sadness' caused by the loss of 'something left behind forever'?
As the war veteran Ben Viljoen observed, "There is scarcely an Afrikander family without an unhealable wound.