unhomely

(redirected from unhomelike)

unhomely

(ʌnˈhəʊmlɪ) or

unhomelike

adj, -lier or -liest
not homely
Mentioned in ?
References in classic literature ?
All that is unhomelike in the future, and whatever maketh strayed birds shiver, is verily more homelike and familiar than your "reality.
We are getting reconciled to halls and bedchambers with unhomelike stone floors and no carpets--floors that ring to the tread of one's heels with a sharpness that is death to sentimental musing.
There is something unhomelike about a motel, especially one that has been so explicitly corporatized.
Freud explains this rupture as the sudden intrusion of the unfamiliar into the familiar, or the alarming appearance of what should not be visible--as when a childhood pasture becomes abruptly unhomelike, a "strange road.
Gerstler suggests that as readers and embodied beings, we inhabit an unhomelike home, at once alien and familiar.
Freud argued that the homelike and the unhomelike have an eerie tendency to include each other ("The 'Uncanny'" 224-26).
As so often, Bishop wished to unsettle binaries such as those of imagination and perception, poetry and prose, homelike and unhomelike, here and there.
This, added to an intense yearning for England's cool climate, greenery, and familiarity, brands the Sudan as a place utterly foreign, unhomelike, and disconcerting (Elliot, 21).
He insists that one's style must have a certain unhomelike quality about it, for that quality produces elevation and dignity and elicits the quasi-religious response of "wonder" (to thaumaston).
Here style has clear implications for the speaker's ethos: to use devices that elevate one's style by making it seem unhomelike may enhance its persuasiveness, but they also make the speaker seem dangerous, a trickster and a half-breed ("mixed wines"), or better, a trickster because a half-breed, that is, one who is both politikos and xenos at the same time.
If the natural world is so double-faced and unhomelike, what world, what thing is real?
In Geoffrey Sanborn's words, "If we accept the argument that the encounter with 'savagery' is the point of origin and reference for the concept of 'humanity,' that concept instantly becomes unheimlich, unhomelike, unsafe for occupation" (1998, 19).