unicorn


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unicorn
The Lady and the Unicorn: "Sight,"one in a series of six 15th-century tapestries

u·ni·corn

 (yo͞o′nĭ-kôrn′)
n.
1.
a. A fabled creature symbolic of virginity and usually represented as a horse with a single straight spiraled horn projecting from its forehead.
b. Heraldry A representation of this beast, having a horse's body, a stag's legs, a lion's tail, and a straight spiraled horn growing from its forehead, especially employed as a supporter for the Royal Arms of Great Britain or of Scotland.
2. Unicorn The constellation Monoceros.

[Middle English unicorne, from Old French, from Late Latin ūnicornis, from Latin, having one horn : ūnus, one; see oi-no- in Indo-European roots + cornū, horn; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

unicorn

(ˈjuːnɪˌkɔːn)
n
1. (European Myth & Legend) an imaginary creature usually depicted as a white horse with one long spiralled horn growing from its forehead
2. (Animals) an imaginary creature usually depicted as a white horse with one long spiralled horn growing from its forehead
3. (Bible) Old Testament a two-horned animal, thought to be either the rhinoceros or the aurochs (Deuteronomy 33:17): mistranslation in the Authorized Version of the original Hebrew
[C13: from Old French unicorne, from Latin ūnicornis one-horned, from ūnus one + cornu a horn]

u•ni•corn

art at unilateral
(ˈyu nɪˌkɔrn)

n.
1. a mythical creature resembling a horse, with a single horn in the center of its forehead: often symbolic of chastity or purity.
2. an animal mentioned in the Bible: now believed to be a wild ox or rhinoceros. Deut. 33:17.
[1175–1225; Middle English unicorne (< Old French) < Latin ūnicornis one-horned; see uni-, -corn]

unicorn

- From a Greek wild ox known as monokeros, "one horn," which, in Latin, became unicornis.
See also related terms for horn.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unicorn - an imaginary creature represented as a white horse with a long horn growing from its foreheadunicorn - an imaginary creature represented as a white horse with a long horn growing from its forehead
imaginary being, imaginary creature - a creature of the imagination; a person that exists only in legends or myths or fiction
Translations
وَحيد القَرْن
jednorožec
enhjørning
yksisarvinen
jednorog
egyszarvú
einhyrningur
vienaragis
vienradzis
jednorożec
jednorožec
enhörning
tek boynuzlu at

unicorn

[ˈjuːnɪkɔːn] Nunicornio m

unicorn

[ˈjuːnikɔːrn] nlicorne f

unicorn

nEinhorn nt

unicorn

[ˈjuːnɪˌkɔːn] nunicorno

unicorn

(ˈjuːnikoːn) noun
in mythology, an animal like a horse, but with one straight horn on the forehead.
References in classic literature ?
The Narwhale I have heard called the Tusked whale, the Horned whale, and the Unicorn whale.
The animals of Abyssinia; the elephant, unicorn, their horses and cows; with a particular account of the moroc.
He of the Unicorn,' this one 'He of the Damsels,' that 'He of the Phoenix,' another 'The Knight of the Griffin,' and another 'He of the Death,' and by these names and designations they were known all the world round; and so I say that the sage aforesaid must have put it into your mouth and mind just now to call me 'The Knight of the Rueful Countenance,' as I intend to call myself from this day forward; and that the said name may fit me better, I mean, when the opportunity offers, to have a very rueful countenance painted on my shield.
The common narwhal, or unicorn of the sea, often attains a length of sixty feet.
In the forest roams a unicorn which does great harm, and you must catch it first.
They were married two months later, and my father sent my sister Elaine to Camelot to ask for a knight to protect us against a wild unicorn.
You are more horned than a unicorn if you assert the contrary.
In 1883 he commanded the steam sealer SEA UNICORN, of Dundee.
When having limbered up the only two cannon that remained uninjured out of the four, they began moving down the hill (one shattered gun and one unicorn were left behind), Prince Andrew rode up to Tushin.
Why the Lion and the Unicorn, of course,' said the King.
There are three there, Bill, with a jolly large blue unicorn and gold pitchfork on 'em: which is the old lady's arms.
You might jist as well call her a griffin, or a unicorn, or a king's arms at once, which is wery well known to be a collection o' fabulous animals,' added Mr.