unidiomatically

unidiomatically

(ʌnˌɪdɪəˈmætɪkəlɪ)
adv
in a way that is not idiomatic
References in periodicals archive ?
Clear textures and some touching moments characterized the performances, but an encompassing coherence was lacking, and the chorus, though fresh and sweet-sounding, sang the French texts unidiomatically.
Robert Browning was so good at creating characters who speak unidiomatically that James Murray, the original editor of the OED, singled him out for having greatly added to his difficulties.
As I have tried to demonstrate in my own analysis of her published Autobiography, Delfina Cuero's expression of this consciousness takes the form of discursive mestizaje, a mestizaje of the border experience that is deep in the "talk" she shares with Chicanas and other women who speak of "the line" (that phrase which is translated unidiomatically in everyday spoken English along the border and in the text) in hushed tones to cloak the clandestine desires and struggles of people who have friends and relations, work and life, on both sides of that artificial divide.
The overall impression I got on this one hearing (I listened to it again a month later on the radio) is that he sounds as if he writes for occasions and purposes that stand outside and at a distance from the music; the result is music that generally accompanies (often with a kind of defeated pulsating and arpeggiated repetitiveness) the action, or music that frequently sounds strangely retrospective, vague or only partially convinced of where it is going, or music that (in the Achille Lauro Captain's opening soliloquy) is distracted by the words into relatively short bursts of clarity followed by longish passages of unidiomatically accented recitative.
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