unilinear


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u·ni·lin·e·ar

 (yo͞o′nĭ-lĭn′ē-ər)
adj.
Of or developing in a linear, usually progressive sequence.

unilinear

(ˌjuːnɪˈlɪnɪə)
adj
developing in a single progressive sequence, esp from simple to advanced

u•ni•lin•e•ar

(ˌyu nəˈlɪn i ər)

adj.
developing or evolving in a steady, consistent, and undeviating way.
[1925–30]
References in periodicals archive ?
Histories written by Enlightenment thinkers such as Voltaire and Gibbon are unilinear and progressive.
The "myth" of a unilinear modernization process is treated similarly.
Neo-evolutionary theory argues that societies pass through defined stages of increasing complexity (bands, tribes, chiefdoms and states, although there may be significant sub-divisions and variations in terminology within each of these categories) in a process that is both unilinear and non-reversible.
Rather than focusing on the wealth disparities between the Northern commissioning parents and the Southern surrogate, this Article takes a more broad approach to redistribution by examining the role of multiple actors in the business that may not follow such a unilinear geographic trajectory.
It sees development as a unilinear, evolutionary process and defines the state of underdevelopment in terms of observable quantitative differences between so-called poor and rich countries, on the one hand, and traditional and modern societies, on the other hand.
This unilinear cultural evolution advocated by Spencer and others assumes "that all human societies past and present develop along a single or unilinear path" (evolutionary line).
It became a system of thought that promised universal unilinear progress to the bounties of communism after capitalism is overthrown.
In other words, rather than seeing the post-colony in a unilinear fashion as the sole invention of colonialism, it is better to see it as a function of the collective inventiveness of the colonial and Nigerian elites.
Mountain people have been typically cast along with non-Western peoples as the Other in the modern paradigm, representatives of an earlier traditional era at one end of a unilinear continuum with modern Western society marking civilization's progress at the other end.
In sum, the transnational state thesis is unsuccessful in avoiding a non-history of capitalism and a unilinear trope about the state's demise, again peculiarly reminiscent of mainstream IR preoccupations about state capacity (see Brenner 1997: 274-5; Evans 1997: 62-98; McMichael 2001: 203-5).
In conclusion, a simple, unilinear etymology is established for tango: Spanish Arabic tahanjul 'dancing' (with mannered poses and moves) > Andalusian tanguillo > tango.
Il a ajoute : << The anthropologist, however, professes to be evolutionary primarily in the sense that he assumes a certain serial order, not by any means unilinear, to pervade the secular changes undergone by the human race.