uninterest


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un·in·ter·est

 (ŭn-ĭn′trĭst, -tər-ĭst, -trĕst′)
n.
Lack of interest or concern; indifference.

uninterest

(ʌnˈɪntrəst; ʌnˈɪntərɛst)
n
no interest or a lack of interest
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References in classic literature ?
Bennett looked at him with the triple-ringed uninterest of the creed that lumps nine-tenths of the world under the title of 'heathen'.
As the author argues: "The frayed relationship with White Rock was almost certainly a factor contributing to Blaine's relative uninterest in the war and specifically the Canadian war effort" (p.
The island mirrors the uninterest in transformation effected in its
In particular he was struck by the uninterest of American economists in real society and real people.
After years of uninterest, South Africa is starting to gear up for a move towards renewable energy and many projects are in the pipeline.
Like Phillips, I suspect that something interesting lies in the seed of uninterest, in the position of those who do not share the assumptions of this sexual world.
On the other hand, if nonresponses bear no relation to de facto risk screening and are merely a product of commercial decisions, uninterest, or disorganization, then nonresponses cannot be regarded as evidence of a functioning regulatory system.
A likely reason for this wall of uninterest on so many important issues is that the disasters involved are often bipartisan in nature, with both Democrats and Republicans being culpable and therefore equally eager to hide their mistakes.
so much as the bored uninterest of the other young people" (xxx), and Boulukos agrees that the "dead silence" "is not the silence of shock or hostility, but the silence of indifference, or a failure of moral engagement, on the part of the younger generation of Bertrams" (5).
The report sums up the Bowdoin curriculum of equal courses as having a certain "flatness" and tending toward "entropy," where faculty and students share the undemanding practice of self-expression, and the uninterest in teaching of the former joins with the uninterest in learning of the latter.
It focuses upon the censor's shifting position towards the staged portrayal and discussion of homosexuality, and describes his struggles with theatre makers and managers who were actively seeking to subvert and circumvent his authority, as well as revealing that the Lord Chamberlain was frustrated by the government's uninterest in reforms to the system.
In their own work, Rose et-al argue that both approaches are "flawed in their uninterest in the human", and propose instead that more attention be paid "to (at least) three aspects of human feeling: the feel of buildings, feeling in buildings, and feelings about buildings" (page 334, original emphasis).