unisonance

unisonance

(juːˈnɪsənəns)
n
the state or quality of agreeing or being identical in sound
References in periodicals archive ?
Behan presents an Ireland in which 'marginal voices and minority discourse' thrive, in which the 'horizontal and homogeneous' falter, and in which the liminality implicit in Treasa/Teresa and Leslie's forbidden romance proffers a future that transcends nationalism's claimed unisonance.
Bhabha calls pedagogical national address, the sound effects evoke an alternative national unisonance in the text, which is akin to his concept of the performative nation.
I argue that it is not Rosa's fragmenting allegorical figure that produces a "national unity" in this novel, and not even the vision of the Battle of Hastings, but that there are certain voices and sound effects involved in the recurring image of ghosts which are responsible for creating a momentary national unisonance.
repetition) that provides magic unisonance, keeping the otherwise fragmenting nation together.
The narrative seems to reproduce her very experience, letting us closer and closer to the secret of the nation she is in search of: a first person voice intrudes into the text, but the narrative soon shifts back to third person, suggesting that the reader is only allowed a glimpse of these magic moments of national unisonance.
Unisonance is the simultaneous response of many people to emblems of the nation, which is well illustrated by an excerpt from a letter written during the Mexican American War.
Military personnel wear the same uniforms and march as a unit to one drum beat, two examples of unisonance.
17] Colonel Davis describes the unisonance of the military community at the sight of the flag:
Moreover, the Mexican soldiers respond in unisonance to the presence of General Morales by identifying themselves as national defenders of "liberty and independence," a grito (battle cry) that echoes back to Mexican independence.
Therefore, this fantastic scenario provides two allegories that speak about the Indian nation in Midnight's Children: first, the body of Saleem Sinai, which, since the narrator, born exactly at the stroke of midnight, "had been mysteriously handcuffed to history" (9), and second, the voices of midnight's children, the extraordinary concerto of "national unisonance," which literally embodies the imagined community of the Indian nation.
The insistence on temporality, the denial of the differences generated, even within the nation, by spatiality, reduce all newspapers in Anderson's construction to one newspaper, just as the nation is formed as one fundamental unisonance.