unity


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u·ni·ty

 (yo͞o′nĭ-tē)
n. pl. u·ni·ties
1.
a. The state or quality of being one or united into a whole: "The Founding Fathers had abhorred the concept of parties, fearing that they would undermine the unity of the nation through factionalism" (Julian E. Zelizer).
b. The state or quality of being in accord; harmony: The judges ruled in unity on the matter.
c. The state or quality of being unified in an aesthetic whole, as in a work of literature: the novel's thematic unity.
d. A whole that is a combination of parts: a group of ideas that taken together constitute a unity.
2. Singleness or constancy of purpose or action; continuity: "In an army you need unity of purpose" (Emmeline Pankhurst).
3. One of the three principles of dramatic structure derived by French neoclassicists from Aristotle's Poetics, stating that a drama should have but one plot, which should take place in a single day and be confined to a single locale.
4. Mathematics
a. The number 1.

[Middle English unite, from Old French, from Latin ūnitās, from ūnus, one; see oi-no- in Indo-European roots.]

unity

(ˈjuːnɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the state or quality of being one; oneness
2. the act, state, or quality of forming a whole from separate parts
3. something whole or complete that is composed of separate parts
4. mutual agreement; harmony or concord: the participants were no longer in unity.
5. uniformity or constancy: unity of purpose.
6. (Mathematics) maths
a. the number or numeral one
b. a quantity assuming the value of one: the area of the triangle was regarded as unity.
c. the element of a set producing no change in a number following multiplication
7. (Art Terms) the arrangement of the elements in a work of art in accordance with a single overall design or purpose
8. (Theatre) any one of the three principles of dramatic structure deriving from Aristotle's Poetics by which the action of a play should be limited to a single plot (unity of action), a single location (unity of place), and the events of a single day (unity of time)
[C13: from Old French unité, from Latin ūnitās, from ūnus one]

u•ni•ty

(ˈyu nɪ ti)

n., pl. -ties.
1. the state of being one; oneness.
2. a whole or totality as combining all its parts into one.
3. the state or fact of being united or combined into one, as of the parts of a whole; unification.
4. absence of diversity; unvaried or uniform character.
5. oneness of mind, feeling, etc., as among a number of persons; concord, harmony, or agreement.
6. Math. the number one; a quantity regarded as one.
7. (in literature and art) harmony among the parts or elements of a work producing a single major effect.
8. one of the three principles of dramatic structure (the three unities) derived from Aristotelian aesthetics by which a play is limited in action to one day (u′nity of time′ ) and one place (u′nity of place′ ) and to a single plot (u′nity of ac′tion ).
[1250–1300; Middle English unite < Old French < Latin ūnitās, derivative of ūnus one]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unity - an undivided or unbroken completeness or totality with nothing wantingunity - an undivided or unbroken completeness or totality with nothing wanting; "the integrity of the nervous system is required for normal development"; "he took measures to insure the territorial unity of Croatia"
state - the way something is with respect to its main attributes; "the current state of knowledge"; "his state of health"; "in a weak financial state"
completeness - the state of being complete and entire; having everything that is needed
incompleteness, rawness - the state of being crude and incomplete and imperfect; "the study was criticized for incompleteness of data but it stimulated further research"; "the rawness of his diary made it unpublishable"
2.unity - the smallest whole number or a numeral representing this numberunity - the smallest whole number or a numeral representing this number; "he has the one but will need a two and three to go with it"; "they had lunch at one"
digit, figure - one of the elements that collectively form a system of numeration; "0 and 1 are digits"
monas, monad - a singular metaphysical entity from which material properties are said to derive
singleton - a single object (as distinguished from a pair)
3.unity - the quality of being united into oneunity - the quality of being united into one
identicalness, indistinguishability, identity - exact sameness; "they shared an identity of interests"

unity

noun
1. union, unification, coalition, federation, integration, confederation, amalgamation the future of European economic unity
2. wholeness, integrity, oneness, union, unification, entity, singleness, undividedness The deer represents the unity of the universe.
wholeness division, separation, disunity, multiplicity, heterogeneity
3. agreement, accord, consensus, peace, harmony, solidarity, unison, assent, unanimity, concord, concurrence Speakers at the rally mouthed sentiments of unity.
agreement division, disagreement, discord, independence, strife, in-fighting, individuality, disunity, ill will, factionalism
Quotations
"We must indeed all hang together, or, most assuredly, we shall all hang separately" [Benjamin Franklin on his signing of the Declaration of Independence]
"All for one; one for all" [Alexandre Dumas The Three Musketeers]
"By uniting we stand, by dividing we fall" [John Dickinson The Patriot's Appeal]

unity

noun
1. The condition of being one:
3. A bringing together into a whole:
4. The result of combining:
5. An identity or coincidence of interests, purposes, or sympathies among the members of a group:
Translations
وَحْدَةٌ كامِلَهوَحْدَه، إتِّفاقوَحْدَه، اكْتِمال
jednotajednotnostshoda
enhedenighedharmoni
egységesség
einingeining, heildarsvipursamstaîa, samheldni
vienovėvientisas dalykasvienybė
saderībavienotībavienots veselums
jednotnosť
enotnost
birlikbütünbütünlük

unity

[ˈjuːnɪtɪ] N (= oneness) → unidad f; (= harmony) → armonía f, acuerdo m
unity of placeunidad f de lugar
unity of timeunidad f de tiempo
unity is strengthla unión hace la fuerza

unity

[ˈjuːnɪti] n
(= union) → unité f
European economic unity → l'unité économique européenne
(= being in agreement) → unité f
There is a need for greater unity in the party → Une plus grande unité est nécessaire au sein du parti.

unity

n
(= oneness, Liter) → Einheit f; (= harmony)Einmütigkeit f, → Einigkeit f; (of a novel, painting etc)Einheitlichkeit f, → Geschlossenheit f; national unity(nationale) Einheit; this unity of purposediese gemeinsamen Ziele; to live in unityin Eintracht leben; unity is strengthEinigkeit macht stark (Prov)
(Math) → Einheit f; (= one)Eins f; (in set theory) → neutrales Element

unity

[ˈjuːnɪtɪ] n (in party, country) → unità; (of members, individuals) → unione f
in unity → in armonia, in pieno accordo

unity

(ˈjuːnəti) plural ˈunities noun
1. the state of being united or in agreement. When will men learn to live in unity with each other?
2. singleness, or the state of being one complete whole. Unity of design in his pictures is this artist's main aim.
3. something arranged to form a single complete whole. This play is not a unity, but a series of unconnected scenes.

unity

n. unidad; unión.
References in classic literature ?
Then, without circumlocution or apology, first pronounced the word "Standish," and placing the unknown engine, already described, to his mouth, from which he drew a high, shrill sound, that was followed by an octave below, from his own voice, he commenced singing the following words, in full, sweet, and melodious tones, that set the music, the poetry, and even the uneasy motion of his ill- trained beast at defiance; "How good it is, O see, And how it pleaseth well, Together e'en in unity, For brethren so to dwell.
To the superstitious mind of Devil's Ford and its few remaining locators, this new partnership seemed to promise that unity of interest and stability of fortune that Devil's Ford had lacked.
Were these to be worthily recounted, they would form a narrative of no small interest and instruction, and possessing, moreover, a certain remarkable unity, which might almost seem the result of artistic arrangement.
There was a sense within her -- too ill-defined to be made a thought, but weighing heavily on her mind -- that her whole orb of life, both before and after, was connected with this spot, as with the one point that gave it unity.
Sympathies, I believe, exist (for instance, between far-distant, long-absent, wholly estranged relatives asserting, notwithstanding their alienation, the unity of the source to which each traces his origin) whose workings baffle mortal comprehension.
In this office of charity, Silas felt, for the first time since he had come to Raveloe, a sense of unity between his past and present life, which might have been the beginning of his rescue from the insect-like existence into which his nature had shrunk.
Just as the click of the reaper means bread, and the purr of the sewing-machine means clothes, and the roar of the Bessemer converter means steel, and the rattle of the press means education, so the ring of the telephone bell has come to mean unity and organization.
The force of imperial sovereignty was insufficient to restrain such powerful dependants; or to preserve the unity and tranquillity of the empire.
It can apply the resources and power of the whole to the defense of any particular part, and that more easily and expeditiously than State governments or separate confederacies can possibly do, for want of concert and unity of system.
New Hampshire, whose constitution was the last formed, seems to have been fully aware of the impossibility and inexpediency of avoiding any mixture whatever of these departments, and has qualified the doctrine by declaring "that the legislative, executive, and judiciary powers ought to be kept as separate from, and independent of, each other AS THE NATURE OF A FREE GOVERNMENT WILL ADMIT; OR AS IS CONSISTENT WITH THAT CHAIN OF CONNECTION THAT BINDS THE WHOLE FABRIC OF THE CONSTITUTION IN ONE INDISSOLUBLE BOND OF UNITY AND AMITY.
Ere they departed, the family was welded once more into a fair semblance of unity.
There seemed none of the unity of purpose between the parts of the body which marks even lethargic sanity.