universalizability


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universalizability

(ˌjuːnɪˌvɜːsəlaɪzəˈbɪlɪtɪ) or

universalisability

n
1. (Philosophy) the thesis that any moral judgment must be equally applicable to every relevantly identical situation
2. (Philosophy) the Kantian principle that if a course of action cannot be universally adopted it must be morally impermissible
References in periodicals archive ?
Governments ought to be ready to help refugees seeking safety"), so long as the explanation of the apparent objectivity and universalizability of the referents of such language does not appeal to the existence of moral properties and the like as part of the fabric of the world.
What is involved in this demand for universalizability is nothing less (or more) than the demand to try to step back from one's own particular interests, beliefs, and feelings to address oneself to an intersubjective public domain governed by rules that all can accept.
On a more formal level, classical egoism as a moral theory is thought to disallow universalizability, not unlike we noted in connection with subjective egoism.
To prove that such objective and rationally acquired imperatives potentially exist for all human beings, Kant resorts to the principle of universalizability and argues that we ought to follow the practical laws based not on higher conditions (such as the will of God) but rather solely on the possibility to provide universal justifications for their validity.
However, the doctrine of universalizability seems to have the absurd consequence that my becoming a professional philosopher is impermissible given that, if everyone became a professional philosopher, we would all starve.
Subjects reaching the last two stages, called post-conventional, are motivated by their understanding of abstract principles, like those upheld by social-contract theory or by a Kantian-like requirement of universalizability.
Universalizability is the idea that any action could be made universal--for example saying to a child, you shouldn't throw your trash on the ground, because what would happen if everybody threw their trash on the ground?
Universalizability suggests that who we are, to whom we are related, and how we are situated should have nothing to do with our moral decision-making.
Another kind of support for the principle comes from the do-unto-others imperative, which supplements universalizability as an ethical standard.
Using social networks for recruiting fails the universalizability test as well since one would not want to live in a world where only those who are members of social networks are employed.
Universalizability in Moral Judgments: Winch's Ambiguity, CHRIS BESSEMANS
As stated, the principle of universalizability presents no difficulties because it is perfectly general.