unleavened bread


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unleavened bread

Bread which is made without a raising agent.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.unleavened bread - brittle flat bread eaten at Passoverunleavened bread - brittle flat bread eaten at Passover
bread, breadstuff, staff of life - food made from dough of flour or meal and usually raised with yeast or baking powder and then baked
References in classic literature ?
A half-dead fire smoked in the centre of the circle, under an iron plate which held a blackened and burned cake of unleavened bread.
These made unleavened bread, and were foes to the death to fermentation.
The quintessence of this danger is matzah, the unleavened bread of Passover (p.
On Green Monday, which is the first Monday of Lent, traditional Lenten food is consumed which consists of vegetables, shellfish, unleavened bread called lachana, dips like hoummus, tahini and taramas, and halvas, a dessert made with tahini which comes in various flavours, mixed with nuts and/or cocoa.
We ordered peshwari naan (stuffed with fruit and nuts) and chapati (thin unleavened bread cooked on a thawa).
A basket of unleavened bread - of the type baked at the Passover meal in Christ's time - was taken up to the altar during the annual service earlier this month.
The tradition of using unleavened bread is not universal.
The prawn puree was certainly not short on prawns cooked in a thick sauce on the deep fried unleavened bread which gave it the ability to do what it's meant to do - that's melt in the mouth.
Though the old Christian European blood libel against the Jews has gained some currency in the Middle East in recent decades, I don't recall anyone suggesting that the IDF had killed al-Dura to siphon off his blood to bake matzah, or unleavened bread, for Passover.
It may be one of the world's oldest specialty dishes dating back to the first century BC when it was said that Hillel the Elder covered lamb and bitter herbs in unleavened bread creating the world's first wrap.
Passover marks the journey of slaves from Egypt, and because these slaves were only given unleavened bread, known as "matzah" in Hebrew, it is a show of gratefulness and respect to rid homes of leavened bread before the holiday.