unlost

unlost

(ʌnˈlɒst)
adj
1. not lost; retained
2. found or regained after having been lost
References in periodicals archive ?
are another inheritance, in present-day EP, of such phonologically unlost syllable weight.
Donna Williams, Autism and Sensing: The Unlost Instinct.
I think everyone should know the things you teach in your class because anyone can get lost but only some can become unlost.
The Canadian classics scholar and poet Anne Carson opened her Martin Classical Lectures, Economy of the Unlost (Reading Simonides of Keos with Paul Celan) (1999b), by repudiating scholarly "objectivity" while, at the same time, apparently criticizing the intrusiveness of her own subjectivity: "There is too much self in my writing .
Well, so am I," gollum, gollum-Bueno, yo tambien cried Bilbo, "and I want to et me he per- dido quiero saber donde unlost.
In addition to Lacoue-Labarthe, see in particular Anne Carson, Economy of the Unlost (Reading Simonides of Keos with Paul Celan) (Princeton: Princeton UP, 1999); and see the extraordinary essays by various hands collected by Arts Fiorestos in Word Traces.
Pinkerton keeps "ancestral glories" safe as "Memory holds, sifting, the unlost stories" (95).
Most importantly, Economy of the Unlost is a moving meditation on poetry as coin thrown on the pyre--praise-words for the gone that render mortality immortal.
To know is to "reconsider," to be "older," enabled, like Quijote and his avatars, to turn unlost past into possibility of a present of one's own.
His legacy is the unlost hours with family and friends who are still with us because of his healing touch.
Enter where, immemorially, Memory holds, sifting, the unlost stories.