unlovely

(redirected from unloveliness)
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un·love·ly

 (ŭn-lŭv′lē)
adj. un·love·li·er, un·love·li·est
1. Not deemed visually attractive.
2. Not pleasant; disagreeable: an unlovely personality.

unlovely

(ʌnˈlʌvlɪ)
adj
1. unpleasant in appearance
2. unpleasant in character
unˈloveliness n

un•love•ly

(ʌnˈlʌv li)

adj.
1. not lovely; without beauty or charm.
2. harsh or repellent in character; unpleasant; disagreeable; objectionable.
[1350–1400]
un•love′li•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unlovely - without beauty or charmunlovely - without beauty or charm    
ugly - displeasing to the senses; "an ugly face"; "ugly furniture"

unlovely

adjective
Not handsome or beautiful:
Idioms: not much for looks, not much to look at, short on looks.
Translations

unlovely

[ˈʌnˈlʌvlɪ] ADJfeo, sin atractivo

unlovely

adj sightunschön; person (in appearance) → abstoßend; (in character) → garstig, unliebenswert
References in classic literature ?
The enormous iron padlock on the doors of the wall cupboard was the only object in the room on which the eye could rest without becoming afflicted by the miserable unloveliness of forms and the poverty of material.
Not far behind them in the league table of unloveliness is Birmingham where 26 per cent of women branded their fellas a mess.
Likewise, the tessitura for Picasso's music is unkindly weighted toward the top of the range, although the resulting unloveliness of certain climaxes is perhaps meant to reflect the painter's more unattractive qualities.
Watching him then--with his ruddy complexion, stocky build and a wild blond mass of hair that made vanity impossible--it was hard not to recoil from the sheer unloveliness of the actor's appearance.
Even his characteristic rage--against the centralizing State, the worshipping of modern idols, the unloveliness of his times--reveals a pathos, a suffering for the loss of the good life.
No dissertation on morality and the human condition follows, and curiously, Egaeus stresses art as much as ethics here; while he briefly philosophizes about 'Evil' being 'a consequence of good', Egaeus associates his personal failings with imaginative deficiency, wondering how 'from Beauty [he has] derived a type of unloveliness [sic]' (333).
649, 655), and she dreams that the children of Guinevere's court demand that the ugly fish be pulled from the pool and left to die for its unloveliness (MG, ll.