unmanageability


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un·man·age·a·ble

 (ŭn-măn′ĭ-jə-bəl)
adj.
1. Difficult or impossible to manage or control: unmanageable traffic congestion.
2. Difficult to carry or maneuver; unwieldy: unmanageable bundles.

un·man′age·a·bil′i·ty n.
un·man′age·a·bly adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
While in many cases, relying on "say-so" may result in overwhelming difficulties relating to the provision of notice and the disbursement of damages, rising to the level of genuine unmanageability, in many cases it may not.
Too much flexibility and choice for the individual may result in too much complexity, uncertainty and unmanageability on behalf of care providers, and vice-versa.
For instance, modeling assumptions (which revert to idealizing the physical system) are generally false relative to a standard governing theory, and the need for a model usually arises from some unmanageability of this governing theory.
In Groarke's hands, the unmanageability of different languages, with the actors and cultures they imply, inflect the lament.
In theology, "we have no choice but to come to terms with a certain unmanageability.
Instead, I accepted that arguments for nonjusticiability on unmanageability grounds had a higher burden of persuasion to meet.
This could be due to many factors: the absence of a predominance criteria in the CPA; the fact that unmanageability (under the preferability criteria) is less likely to be pleaded because there are only ten provinces; the homogeneity of the Canadian common law; the greater recourse to subclassing or other management techniques; or the simple fact that Canadian courts are more plaintiffs-friendly than US courts (92) and duck the law in order to favour practical resolution of claims through class settlements.
Board of Education of Topeka, gave rise to similar problems of judicial unmanageability.
63) The particular temptations on which Chauvet focuses are: treating religious knowledge as a way to assert control over "the unmanageability of the Spirit"; using ritual as "magic," as a way to achieve an effect we desire without having to face the consequences for our inner life of a genuine encounter with God; and using good works "to obtain leverage" over God.
1978) (declining to preclude individual damage suits and citing the "lack of common questions of fact as to many of those claims, and the unmanageability of the suit had they been included").
She admitted publicly that she was powerless over her anorexia, and it caused significant unmanageability in her life -- losing teeth, hair, breasts for example," continued Dr.
Comparison of DBT targets and 12-Step philosophy DBT targets 12-Step philosophy Emotional dysregulation Internal unmanageability * Affective liability and * "Emotional volatility is often one of problems with anger the most obvious ways in which we can indentify personal unmanageability.