unmerchantable


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unmerchantable

(ʌnˈmɜːtʃəntəbəl)
adj
(Commerce) formal (of goods) not suitable for trading
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.unmerchantable - not fit for saleunmerchantable - not fit for sale      
unsalable, unsaleable - impossible to sell
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References in classic literature ?
The dead and for the most part unmerchantable wood behind my house, and the driftwood from the pond, have supplied the remainder of my fuel.
Unmerchantable trees (too small to process into sawlogs) plus the limbs and tops of merchantable trees were piled at roadside landings for disposal by open burning.
In the ReShip plan, Aston University (UK) scientists are concerned as this plan would utilize low quality, Norwegian forest wood waste like: chippings and unmerchantable wood left in forests after logging has occurred - to make biofuel.
The wood supply of hardwood and unmerchantable conifer is coming from the Algoma, Big Pic, Black River, Magpie, Nagagami, Pic River Ojibwa and White River Forests.
In other words, are the cigarettes unmerchantable because of the manner of manufacture?
Instead, crews on foot use chain saws, brush cutters and matches to cut small unmerchantable trees and brush, stack them into piles, then burn them when conditions are right.
You have a claim for unmerchantable quality under the Sale of Goods Act.
Close to Memphis, the exhaustion had reached a point where it was "profitable to return to cut-over areas for trees that were formerly regarded as too small to log and for less valuable species, such as tupelo and water gum," which at the time of the first logging were unmerchantable but now commanded "a ready sale" (Timber Depletion 26-27).
In the 1680s, the auditor-general reported that "the quantity of unmerchantable leaf passed upon collectors was so large that the revenue from this source had dwindled almost to nothing.
In a typical appraisal situation such as this, there may be a cut-over tract of land, with remaining logging debris and a few scattered unmerchantable trees.
Other potential mitigating factors include: more labor-intensive logging and milling operations as timber becomes more valuable; utilization of formerly unmerchantable material; and continued importation of sawtimber.