unmetrical

unmetrical

(ʌnˈmɛtrɪkəl)
adj
not having, using, or relating to poetic metre
References in classic literature ?
Its wrenched accents and slurred syllables sometimes appear absolutely unmetrical, but it seems that Donne generally followed subtle rhythmical ideas of his own.
He preserves almost all the original spellings in his transcription, including the retention of final 'e's even where ungrammatical and unmetrical, and is in general conservative in his adoption of the emendations of past editors, or, occasionally, his own.
But there is the danger that they will cast free verse indelibly as postregular (postmetrical) (or in the French case, post-libere) rather than as prototabular (postlinear) and that, in so doing, they will encourage us to think of free verse as unmetrical, or non-metrical, rather than as demetrified.
he has fallen, it appears, under the dangerous influence of Whitman, and writes many poems in unmetrical sprawling lengths that, in his hands, have nothing to commend them" (111-112).
5) As You Like It and Tamburlaine are both misquoted (52, 82) in ways that make their blank verse unmetrical, and a letter from Martin Slater offering 'an astonishing 500 [pound sterling] for highway maintenance' in exchange for permission to finish building the Red Bull appears to have been misinterpreted (72).
Naturally, this is the case of hymns such as that to St Cosmas and St Damian (104), St Justus and St Pastor (146) (20), In restauratione basilicae (188) (21), St Adrian and St Natalia (86) (the manuscripts give 15 sors et instead of Castro's unmetrical sors est inherited from Blume: the apparatus should be corrected as for D), as already in Norberg (22).
And an unmetrical line bumbles and bumps, reminding me of a rider not quite in sync with his horse.
80) He notes as well that when the name "Falstaff" appears in verse in 2 Henry IV, it is always metrical, unlike the one unmetrical occurrence in I Henry IV where the original metre requires the name "Oldcastle.
106), but Thompson and Taylor keep the unmetrical F reading.
Thom's text is sensibly conservative and he endeavours to preserve the reading of the Farnese codex wherever possible, only adopting the more necessary corrections or modifications (hence he follows Wachsmuth in correcting the manuscript's aido to aeido, instead of opting for Ursinus'aeiso in line 6, and prefers Scaliger's pantessi instead to Mosheim's kai pasi for the unmetrical pasi in line 3).
This happens because the unaccented syllables of the line, the unheard "one must" which echoes half heard from the first line, open up an entirely unmetrical pause between the first and second syllables, so that the poet tends to thump stumblingly on both have and been, only righting his balance and holding himself poised on the word cold for a second long pause.
And the sequence "leads men" poses a difficulty for prosodists who believe in metrical and unmetrical lines.