unpedantic

unpedantic

(ˌʌnpɪˈdæntɪk)
adj
not pedantic; informal
References in periodicals archive ?
Corresponding with Merle Curti on 7 March and 4 April 1947, he accordingly eschewed attempts "to stuff historical work with a jargon or lingo" and "uncouth terminology that has been given education by the professional pedagogues," for "historical writing ought to be kept fresh, simple, literary, and unpedantic.
It provides excellent, unpedantic advice (note his use of a preposition with which to end a sentence).
7) a modern adaptation of historical dance (in the film Elizabeth) in which the dance consultant, drawing freely on authentic sources to realize the director's interpretation, actually showed an unpedantic theatrical professionalism that perhaps had its roots in the Stuart masque.
Nonetheless, The World within the Word, Habitations of the Word, and Tests of Time: Essays continue to feature the perspective of an intellectual, a scholar, and a creative writer, someone who can treat arcane philosophical subjects as well as more timely issues, in a lively, unpedantic, but insightful manner.
He illuminates the allure of this (for me, at least) unpedantic creative-interpretive tendency in terms of Vergil's own poetic agenda.
Manzoni's free, unpedantic and at times inconsistent, but on the whole highly sophisticated use of French was a consequence of his familiarity with the intellectual circles he had frequented in Paris with his mother Giulia Beccaria (Cesare Beccaria's daughter).
Unpedantic and enjoyable reading, the tale reveals astonishing similarities between East and West when it comes to the use of the breath and the body.
Viennot's study, displays an "aristocratic culture" whose witty, unpedantic esthetic is meant to persuade, "never to demonstrate that she was learned, which she already knew she was" (175); similarly for Madeleine de Scudery, according to C.
All in all, Bircher's two volumes provide a lively, unpedantic, economical, and well-founded introduction to the life and works of one of the foremost writers of the twentieth century.
Either way, both the "Seminars" and the "Nights" have that peremptory but charmingly unpedantic tone characteristic of Greenberg, who always seems to write as if he were speaking and speak as if he were thinking out loud - which in many places he does; I find these passages the most stimulating.
Bantering, ironic, sporty, unpedantic, immaculate in dress and expression, faultlessly kind, Eqbal in the end had two great themes: liberation and injustice, how to achieve the first without reproducing more of the second.